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 Post subject: S
PostPosted: Tue Sep 12, 2006 8:46 pm 
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Joined: Jul 25, 2003
Motorcycle: 98 Valkyrie
Rebel: 250
Country: USA
State/Province: GA
City: Vidalia
Scoot(er): Motorcycle


Screaming Night Hog/Owl/Train: A biker who, when traveling long distances, prefers to ride at night (avoiding the heavy traffic and usually at high speeds). Most common with air-cooled bikes in the desert states, they can be found anywhere on earth. The chief characteristic is the "Screaming;" this term refers more to the non-stop or infrequent stop riding patterns of long-distance riders than it does to the habit of chronic speeding. After all, while never a great idea, excessive speeding is just plain dumb in the dark....


SeaFoam: A chemical wrench, essentially an additive for gasoline engines. Extremely effective for cleaning fuel systems, stabilizing fuel, and helping to remove moisture from tainted fuel. Not really about motorcycles, but extremely popular here, and mentioned enough to warrant an entry. Sold in many forms, the most useful one comes in a white metal can with red lettering and graphics. Available at most any part store these days. More info at http://www.seafoamsales.com/


Shaft Drive: more popular on mid-sized and larger metric cruisers, this system incorporates a drive shaft similar in design to that found in an automobile. Very smooth delivery and low maintenance, little more is required than fluid checks at longer intervals. However, if these drive systems are utilized on any transversely mounted engine (such as the standard V-Twin or parallel twin arranged in the frame like the Rebel) they are quite inefficient on the power delivery, robbing as much as 25% of the power to the rear wheel along the way via gearing systems designed to alter the direction of rotation.


Shock Gaitors: protective sleeves that keep debris out of the sliding mechanism and seals of shocks. Simliar to Fork Gaitors, but for the rear shocks. Most commonly seen on dirtbikes, most commonly _needed_ on softails, due to the shocks being mounted under the motorcycle. See Gaitors.


Sissy Bar: Passenger backrest, in particular those that are extremely tall or long.


Six Pack Rack A particularly small style of luggage rack, usually barely large enough to support a six-pack. The most common type of luggage rack available for cruisers today.


Skid Lid: Helmet, particularly a Novelty Helmet or half-helmet.


Skitching: Yes, unbelievably, they've named this practice. Raising skiing from a humiliation to an art form, Icy Hott Stuntahz, Kanji Kids, and other types of squids use this term to refer to the inspid act of driving nails or screws into the soles of your shoes and dragging them on the pavement to create sparks. Never underestimate stupid. Ever. :roll: In some circles, it's simply called "Sparkin';" the nails or screws are called "Sparkers" and footgear so equipped is called "Sparks." Again: :roll:


Skyshot: An archaic term for a particular kind of wheelie, the goal of which is to get the front end as high as possible. The 'perfect skyshot' results in a bike that is exactly perpendicular to the ground. also, more archaicaly: moonshot, moon launch. See also: "catwalk"


Slam: to reduce a bike's ground clearance through modification of the frame or suspension, or in extreme cases by removing the suspension entirely.


Sled: slang term for a motorcycle.


Sloshing: Much less common with the spread of suburbia all over the nation, this is the time-honored tradition of discovering you're out of fuel and stopping the bike and leaning it way, way over toward the petcock side in an attempt to get whatever remains in the opposite apron of the tank over the center hump. Cruiser and sportbike tanks are designed in such a fashion that there is little payoff for this, but the old standards could hide up to a pint of gas in the far apron. Caveat: you also get all the moisture and trash that has been accumulating in that apron.


Soft Tail: refers to a (typically) mono-shock swingarm cruiser, has the Rigid or Hardtail styling yet retains at least some degree of rear suspension capability. The name is a word play of "hardtail," as the key styling element of this design is the hidden rear suspension; soft tails are designed to look like hardtails. The styling trade-off is less wheel-travel and generally less efficient suspension than a full swing-arm rear, but still worlds ahead of a hardtail for comfort.


Spine: another term for "backbone..


Sport Bike: the racy, light-weight mega-fast bikes with short windshields and narrow full fairings, comfort is not usually the primary consideration on these bikes (though this has been changing over the years); rather they are made for hard acceleration, quick and responsive manuevering, and unparalleled stopping power. Inspired from racing bikes-- in many cases they are race-ready from the dealer's floor, these bikes represent the absolute cutting edge of motorcycle technology. The downside of of being on the cutting edge is that they are _very_ quickly obsoleted by the next generation or two of sportbikes.


Sport Standard: an attempt to declassify sport bikes, essentially these are unfaired sport bikes. They are essentially sportbikes that have had the bars raised and pegs lowered so that they ride and handle more like the Standards of the 60s-80s. Most of them are somewhat de-tuned, sacrificing some power for durability and mid-range pull. Often marketed as "Naked" bikes.


Sport Tourer: a bike designed for a niche market, a sport-tourer is usually based on a sport bike or a sport standard, and retains much of the performance and styling of the sportbikes it is derived from. They also feature minor concessions ot comfort, such as larger windshields, slightly more relaxed ergonomics, and luggage.


Sporty: Familiar term for the Harley Davidson Sportster model.


Sportster: The closest thing to a motorcycle that Harley Davidson has ever managed to build.


Springer: referring to the old design of fork assemblies, most common type utilizes one solid set of forks that mount to the triple trees like modern hydraulic forks, with a second set of moving forks (aka sprung forks) that are attached to coil springs (and modern springers utilize a shock absorber). The bottom end consists of a rocker that mounts, from rear to front, to the solid fork, the sprung fork, and the axle...the wheel pivots up and down with the sprung fork via the solid rear fork.


Sring/Sprung Seat: also "Springer seat." Most commonly found on older bikes but making a comeback on old school styled choppers, this is a seat that pivots via the forward mount behind the tank and rests on a spring or springs. Varying types of springs, ranging from a leaf to coils to the angled type (such as those found on squeezing hand-grip exercisers found in sporting goods stores)


SQUID: Acronym, SQUirrely kID or SQUished KId. In reference to younger MC riders with little respect to posted speed limit laws, self safety or safety of others. Also, any person who habitually rides beyond his skill level, or believes that his skill level and riding ability is far beyond what it actually is. Commonly found doing really stupid things on repeatedly-repaired motorcycles. ;)


Standard: a more upright styled bike, with little attention to styling. Generally more powerful, better handling than cruisers but not anything like a sport bike, though they tend to offer more long-range comfort than sportbikes or cruisers. The Honda Goldwing is currently the only Standard still manufactured by the Big Five, but it is an unusual example of the breed.


Steel Horse: Another term that the new wave of motorcycle enthusiasts seems to think adds macho credibility to their "years of being a biker." this term is also well-coined, and has been for over a hundred years, when the first "steel horses" were used to plow fields and twitch lumber from the forests. A steel horse is _not_ a motorcycle; it is a tractor.


Steel Pipe: See Drag Bars


Steering Head: the tubular section at the front of a frame where the triple trees mount to via the steering stem, a long bolt running from the upper tree to the lower and passing through a set of bearings inside the steering head itself.


Steth: A corruption of the word "stethoscope," used in mechanical reference as the verb form of that word; that is: "to use a mechanic's stethoscope to pinpoint source of or determine the qualities of a particular noise. This can be done a number of ways, the most common two being to use either a mechanic's stethoscope or a steel shaft of some sort as a resonating device.


Stethoscope: In mechanical terms, it's a specialty tool used to study various engine noises, particularly internal noises. The mechanic's stethoscope features ear pieces and sound-carrying tubing like the medical tool of the same name, but instead of a vibrating tympanum it features a long metal shaft. This shaft, places against a solid object, resonates harmonically, creating an amplified version of the noises found specifically at the location of contact, while the ear pieces serve the dual purposes of both conveying this sound to the mechanic's ears and filtering out extraneous noises that may otherwise interfere with the perception of the singular noise being tracked.


Stoppie: the act of stopping a motorcycle and having the rear wheel lift off the ground, the reverse of a wheelie. Also called (archaic) an "Endo," though an Endo generally features a 'tail-whip' that reverses the facing of the bike before the rear wheel touches back to the ground.


Street Tracker: Derived from "Board Trackers" or simply "Tracker," this was originally a bike built to specifications similar to the bikes used to race the old small tracks, most particularly, the indoor wooden ("board") tracks. However, these bikes were built with an eye to street use, including extensive run time, stop-and-go traffic, etc. Essentially a hot-rod with key stylistic elements. Today, this term refers more to a bike street-legal bike that retains the look of the old 'Trackers, but not necessarily the performance.


Swingarm: the rear portion of a bike that the rear wheel mounts to, a pivoting structure that moves up and down with the rear suspension


Swamp Butt: see Monkey Butt


Swapper: A term most commonly used amongst older long-time riders and customizers. With the explosion of motorcycles and the pop culture emphasis on customized motorcycles combined with the relative scarcity of the skill sets required to actual chop or bob a motorcycle, and the instant-gratification demands of modern society, an entire subset of the motorcycle aftermarket has popped into being that does nothing but manufacture and sell bolt on kits designed to make a motorcycle look as though it has actually been bobbed or chopped. The term "swapper" is used as a derogative comment about "bobbers" and "choppers" that are neither bobbed nor chopped, but instead use kits and off-the-shelf parts as direct bolt-on "swap-outs" for existing factory parts.





A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Numerical


Last edited by Duke on Fri Mar 05, 2010 8:57 pm, edited 39 times in total.

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 Post subject: T
PostPosted: Tue Sep 12, 2006 8:46 pm 
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Joined: Jul 25, 2003
Motorcycle: 98 Valkyrie
Rebel: 250
Country: USA
State/Province: GA
City: Vidalia
TANSTAAFL: Originally coined by the author and outspoken self-reliance; personal-responsibility champion Robert Hienlien, this is an acronym for "There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch. Hienlien-- a renowned individualist-- originally coined the term in reference to the fact that there is no such thing as a government handout: the government cannot give you something that it didn't take from you to start with; at best, it can hide from you exactly where it took it from. It was also used to eschew the concept of entitlement of any kind: you don't work, then you don't eat. No one gets back more than they put in.

The concept, however, has a surprising universality, and has been found to apply to _all_ forms of measurable science, and not just the political sciences. It fits from theology to physics, and to everywhere in between. Want to make "pollution free" electric cars? TANSTAAFL: you're burning more coal at the power plants to save burning the gas at the car. Want to get "free" speed boosts by changing your gearing? TANSTAAFL: you're losing the horsepower you need to move through the curve effectively, and placing the wear and tear off the engine and onto the transmission and clutch. Want to get a "free" boost to your headlight power? TANSTAAFL: you're increasing the demand on your charging system. Want to get into heaven and snag up 72 virgins? TANSTAAFL: you have to commit suicide, and the virgins are all thirty-five year old men with Warcraft accounts and made their very own costumes for the Star Trek convention.

In short, something doesn't come from nothing. Not now; not ever. Even the theory that the matter in the universe may have been formed when "nothing" folded back on itself and spontaneously created matter. Doesn't hold water for one reason: "nothing," by definition, has nothing that can be folded. Applying TANSTAAFL, either this theory is wrong, or "nothing" is really some kind of something, and we don't know enough about it yet.


Tach: Tachometer

Tachometer: A device used to measure the speed at which the engine is running. Results are read in RPMs: the number of revolutions that the first piston on the crankshaft (#1 piston) completes in one minute.

Tail Chaser: Extreme twisties, notably stretches of roads with multiple switch backs, extended tight curves, etc.

Ton: One hundred miles an hour. Conversational, as in "pulled the ton." also: "Dollar"


Torque Surge: See "Creep"


Tourer: a type of motorcycle designed for long distance riding, typically a heavier bike with hard luggage and comfortable seating arrangements. Also referred to as "Touring Rig", "Geezer Glide", and "old man's bike."

Trail: Along with Rake (above), one of two measurements of steering geometry used to determine the handling characteristics of a motorcycle. The definition of these characteristics are difficult to digest into an easily-understood sentence or two, so feel free to check the following links:
1) Simplified definitions and diagrams of Rake and Trail
2) Expanded definitions and some easy-to-follow definitions and explanations of Rake and Trail
3) Surprising experiments and research into the realities of Rake and Trail as opposed to the commonly-accepted notions. Interesting read; easy to follow; with pics
4) Handy online calculator to determine rake and trail
Now you know more than most folks! :wink:

Triple: a three cylinder inline motorcycle engine

Triple Clamps: the two pieces that attach the bike's front end to the frame, named after the three positions on each piece; one for each fork tube and a center for the steering stem

Triple Trees: the Triple Clamps. I have no idea how they came to be called 'trees,' except that they always have been...

Turtle: vehicle, usually a car or pick-up truck, characterized by painfully slow acceleration. With the current trend in vehicle shapes, this one was almost prophetic.

Twin: any two cylinder engine

Twisties: a road or section of road characterized by numerous curves; a real treat for most riders.




A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Numerical


Last edited by Duke on Wed Sep 22, 2010 8:19 am, edited 11 times in total.

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 Post subject: U
PostPosted: Tue Sep 12, 2006 8:47 pm 
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Joined: Jul 25, 2003
Motorcycle: 98 Valkyrie
Rebel: 250
Country: USA
State/Province: GA
City: Vidalia
UJM: Term given to Japanese motorcycles of the 70's, because visually they all looked extremely similar (they were all Standards); an air-cooled inline 2 or 4 cylinder with straight tank and seat, until you were close enough to read the tank emblems or were extremely familiar with the unique characteristics of each marque, they tended to look identical.

Universal Japanese Motorcycle: UJM, written long-hand.




A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Numerical


Last edited by Duke on Sat Sep 12, 2009 1:15 pm, edited 5 times in total.

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 Post subject: V
PostPosted: Tue Sep 12, 2006 8:48 pm 
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Joined: Jul 25, 2003
Motorcycle: 98 Valkyrie
Rebel: 250
Country: USA
State/Province: GA
City: Vidalia
V: A configuration of engine in which cylinders are angularly opposed and the cylinders are separated rather than in a single continuous bank.

V-Four: often seen as "V4" or "V-4". A four cylinder motorcycle engine with the cylinders aranged in two rows in an angled V, best compromise between high powered inline fours and high torque V-Twins.

V-Twin: often seen as "v2" or "V-2." A 2 cylinder motorcycle engine with the cylinders arranged in an angled V. Most cruiser and off-road V-twins feature a 'single pin crankshaft.' This is an internal configuration that produces far more torque than other engine configurations, making it ideal for 4-wheelers or other off-road machines. More perfromance-oriented V Twins use dual-pin cranks, which allow for higher revs and greater horsepower, with a sacrifice in torque.

Valance: The 'sides' of the fender. That is, those parts of the fenders that are visible in profile. This term by itself does not refer to any particular style of valance. A valance can range from minimal or 'open' fenders, such as the front fender of the Rebel and other bikes, all the way to 'full-valance' fenders, such as the Indian Chief or the Kawasaki Drifter.




A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Numerical


Last edited by Duke on Wed Jan 21, 2009 11:16 pm, edited 4 times in total.

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 Post subject: W
PostPosted: Tue Sep 12, 2006 8:48 pm 
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Joined: Jul 25, 2003
Motorcycle: 98 Valkyrie
Rebel: 250
Country: USA
State/Province: GA
City: Vidalia
Water Cooled: A liquid-cooled engine that uses a radiator and circulating water/coolant to control engine temperature. Essentially, this is the same system used by cars.

Wave: The single most commonly discussed thing on motorcycle forums, bar none. Most commonly brought up by new riders. Nothing wrong with that, but really--- it's out there, all over. 10% of the threads on this board alone in the 'rebel talk' section are devoted entirely to this topic. Do a search.

Wick: the throttle.
Quote:
Analagous to hurricane lanterns - turning the wick up = brighter bigger flame

turning the wick up on the throttle = more gas = bigger flames(sic)


Wing: (also "'wing"). The Honda Goldwing. Not a derogatory term; just easier to say (and type).

Winger: (also: "Winger" and "Wing Nut," which is a pun on 'obsession for a 'Wing' and the fastener called by the same name) a person riding a Goldwing.

Wolf Trap: original trade name for the small bungee nets popular for securing cargo on motorcycles. Sometimes used amongst us old folks as a term for any small bungee net.

WOT: acronym for Wide Open Throttle; a reference to riding a bike under hard accelleration at high speed.




A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Numerical


Last edited by Duke on Wed Jan 21, 2009 11:16 pm, edited 8 times in total.

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 Post subject: X
PostPosted: Tue Sep 12, 2006 8:50 pm 
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Motorcycle: 98 Valkyrie
Rebel: 250
Country: USA
State/Province: GA
City: Vidalia
X-Wing: A prototype Honda released in 2000 for the press, and intended to be released to the public within a year or two of that, this bike was the "King" of sport/touring bikes. A lightly-faired and -bagged sportbike, designed around the Goldwing, sporting cutting edge technology for performance and comfort. While very interesting to look at, a half ton of motorcycle was a dismal failure with the sportbike set, and the styling missed the mark with the touring set.

Sadly, this is one of most gorgeous bikes I have ever laid eyes on, and I was positively _vibrating_ with anticipation of owning one. It was shelved in favor of the RUiNEd...

http://www.motorcycledaily.com/xwingrev.html

http://www.motorcycle.com/mo/mchonda/xwing.html

Appropos of nothing you'll ever find on this board, and probably nowhere else at this point, I posted it here simply because--

well, this is "X," and I bet you thought I had nothing ;)




A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Numerical


Last edited by Duke on Wed Jan 21, 2009 11:16 pm, edited 4 times in total.

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 Post subject: Y
PostPosted: Tue Sep 12, 2006 8:50 pm 
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Joined: Jul 25, 2003
Motorcycle: 98 Valkyrie
Rebel: 250
Country: USA
State/Province: GA
City: Vidalia
youTube: A nifty place for finding video clips on any subject imagineable, including, if you're persistent, things that might serve to teach you some better riding skills. Just never, ever read _any_ commentary about _any_ clip, as doing so will wash eighty points right out of your IQ. YouTube is a double-edged sword, in that it is both one of the best free tools on the internet while still managing to be the Internet Short Bus.... :?




A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Numerical


Last edited by Duke on Sat Jan 24, 2009 1:08 pm, edited 5 times in total.

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 Post subject: Z
PostPosted: Tue Sep 12, 2006 8:52 pm 
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Motorcycle: 98 Valkyrie
Rebel: 250
Country: USA
State/Province: GA
City: Vidalia
Z-Bars: A particular style of handlebars characterized by sharp angles, usually less than 90 degrees. This is one of those things it's just easier to look at it than to explain. To that end, I've recieved some links I posted below.

Of note, they are the most difficult bars to run internal wires through, as they tend to have acute angles _and_ tend to be full of welding slag...

http://www.chopperdaves.com/bikes/zbar02.jpg

http://www.paulyaffeoriginals.com/pyo-c ... -zbars.htm

http://www.tejasthumpcycles.com/Parts/h ... z-bars.JPG

http://store.cyrilhuze.com/CyrilHuze/As ... 0321-1.jpg

This next one is a real close up, clean shot that let's you fully appreciate just what a pain these things are to wire up clean-like:

http://www.tejasthumpcycles.com/Parts/h ... z-bars.JPG

If any of these links go dead, let me know so I can clean it up.




A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Numerical


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 Post subject: Re: Glossary (S-Z on page 2)
PostPosted: Wed Apr 13, 2011 2:04 am 
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Joined: May 12, 2009
Country: USA
State/Province: OK
City: East Of One City
I would like to recommend that adding of GAS SURPRISE: Stitching to RESERVE only to find out you didn't switch it back at the last fill up.

_________________
Let us rise up and be thankful, for if we didn't learn a lot today, at least we learned a little, and if we didn't learn a little, at least we didn't get sick, and if we got sick, at least we didn't die; so, let us all be thankful.
Buddha


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 Post subject: Re: Glossary (S-Z on page 2)
PostPosted: Mon Feb 17, 2014 10:44 pm 
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Joined: Jul 25, 2003
Motorcycle: 98 Valkyrie
Rebel: 250
Country: USA
State/Province: GA
City: Vidalia
I know; it's been a _long_ time, but I haven't forgotten this, Norskemann. It's just going to have to wait a while longer-- after the translation to the current software, old posts are now un-editable simply because they are no longer stored where their internal records think they are stored. :?

The only real fix for this right now is to redo the entire glossary, and if you hit "quote" on any _one_ of these entries, you'll see there are a _ton_ of links to fix to make that happen....

Sorry, Amigo.

_________________

Duke
"Skills must be Learned"
------ Herb Christian


"Ask your doctor if medical advice from a television commercial is right for _you_."


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