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 Post subject: Glossary (S-Z on page 2)
PostPosted: Tue Jul 26, 2005 11:22 pm 
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Glossary

Okay folks, this is a simple attempt, and don't think it's inclusive by any stretch of the imagination. It is my hope that this document will serve two purposes: First and foremost, it is intended to serve a reference for people new to bikes in general who may run into terms that they are unfamiliar with. While the general plan is to focus on terms encountered on this forum, terms from all over the hobby will likely be included. Second is my less-altruistic motive, and that is my hope that a glossary will help to cut down on my e-mail and PM time by saving people the effort of asking "what does this mean?"

This idea was inspired by the repeated asking of the question "What's a FLIBS?" and cemented by an almost-heated discussion over the word "Poser."

As I said, this is not inclusive, and is not meant to be a text book of any kind. In fact, as it will initially be worked on in my scant spare time, most of which is late at night, it may not even be coherent. But it is also dynamic; it will change and grow with the forum. To this end, I ask that anyone who encounters a term that they feel should be in the Glossary, please send a PM to one of the mods or post it to the Lounge--it takes only seconds, really-- and request that your term be added. Keep definitions short, for obvious reasons please, as there are subtle differences between a Glossary and a Dictionary. The mods are all able to edit in your term and its definition in alphanumeric order, so this should remain a simple, easy to browse thread. In the interest of ease of use, I have gone to great lengths to ensure that any term used in a definition that itself has a definition in the Glossary is linked back to the definition, just in case it might help the reader to better understand the definition he reads.

Folks, all I can say is that this is meant to help, and that it will not work without the help and participation of the members. Considering the vast amount of volunteer effort everyone has put into everything else in the FAQ, this may prove to have been a complete waste of my time. If so, well, I know I tried.

I'll try to keep them alphabetical, with a numbers post first, then additional posts for each letter.

Anyone with any suggestions or requested additions, feel free to post them here if you prefer this to shooting a note to a staff member; someone will work them in. Just keep in mind that once they have been added or declined, the suggestion post will be deleted in the interest of thread clarity.

So here we go:

Glossary of Terms, relevant to this forum and bikes in general

To peruse the Glossary in its entirety, read on!

In a hurry? Then don't read on :D Hit the links to skip directly to the alphabetical section you're looking for.

Though technically, they are before the Alphabeticals, Numerical listings are linked after the Alpha links for formatting's sake.


A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Numerical


Last edited by Duke on Sat Jan 24, 2009 1:10 pm, edited 27 times in total.

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 Post subject: numerics
PostPosted: Tue Sep 12, 2006 8:23 pm 
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1%-er: Generic descritpion of a motorcycle club member. Not to be confused with a Riding Club member. The term evolved after the Hollister events, when the AMA determined that only a mere 1% of motorcyclists acted in a wanton and criminal manner and the rest were "normal people"

2/10 Warranty: A derisive reference to bikes in dubious condition being sold with the promise of being in excellent service condition. Drawing on such things as 4/40 Warranties (Four years or Forty thousand miles), the joke is alleging a warranty on the bike good for "2 miles or ten minutes, whichever comes first."

60/40:A type of dual-purpose tire, available generally in narrower sizes, as they are targeted for dirtbikes, dual sport bikes, and older mid-sized standards. The number is written as a ratio, and means that the tread is designed for a bike that sees roughly sixty-percent street use and forty-percent off-road use.


80/20: A type of dual-purpose tire, available generally in narrower sizes, as they are targeted for dirtbikes, dual sport bikes, and older mid-sized standards. The number is written as a ratio, and means that the tread is designed for a bike that sees roughly eighty-percent street use and twenty-percent off-road use. Generally, they appear to be aggressive street tires with unusually wide and deep cuts in the tread pattern. Don't scoff; they are a _great_ addition to anyone living on a dirt road.




A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Numerical


Last edited by Duke on Wed Jan 21, 2009 11:09 pm, edited 8 times in total.

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 Post subject: A
PostPosted: Tue Sep 12, 2006 8:24 pm 
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Aftermarket: The "market" refers to new retailers of factory goods, such as bikes and accessories made, or at least branded and endorsed, by the manufacturer of the particular motorcycle they are intended to fit. Third-party goods, such as parts-store, universal application, or materials made by a company that does _not_ manufacture motorcycles are refered to as "aftermarket" items. That is, you buy them after you leave the 'marketplace' set up by the motorcycle manufacturer. Though in reality, you can usually order aftermarket goods from a dealer, too. ;) Original items from the original manufacturer are called "OEM" parts.


AMA: American Motorcycle Association. In theory, a quasi-political group dedicated to protecting the interests of riders. In reality, a source of badly-skewed statistics, newsletters, stickers, patches, insurance discounts, and general well-intentioned waffling on any issue.


Ape Hangers: refers to a handlebar style where the handgrips are located at a higher position, so as to enable the rider's arms to "hang" Picture "Clyde" from "Every Which Way but Loose" and you'll get a perfect understanding of the riding position


Ape Hooks: Less-common term for Ape Hangers (no link on this one. I mean, c'mon! It's right above this one! ;) ) also, Monkey Bars


Air Bike(r): Air Bikes are the fictitious motorcycles owned by Dudeman. Interestingly, most Air Bikes do not exist in the present tense. While some Air Bikes are in fact "sitting in the garage" or "in the shop," the vast majority of Air Bikes exist only in the past or the future:

"I used to own a Vintage 1940 Air Bike with dual overhead cranks and super-load set of intake pipes, but then the wrist pins got messed up in the carpal tunnels, and I had to let it go. But Dude, I am _so_ going to get me one of those big ol' chrome-covered noise-belching Air Bikes with the big thing on the side and the lights and that kickin' flame job!"

Air Bikes are unique in that they are built of the same metal that was fibered and spun into the glistening fabric from which the Emperor's new clothes were made: only the true of heart can actually _see_ them. Sadly, only Dudeman himself is pure enough of heat to actually lay eyes on them.

An Air Biker is anyone who owns / owned / will very soon own an Air Bike of his very own.


Air cooled: any engine that is cooled exclusively by direct convection of heat to the surrounding atmosphere. These engines are characterized by rows heat sinks (usually an arrangement of "fins") used to increase the surface area presented to the air


Air Head: Generally refers to a style of air-cooled horizontally-opposed BMW engine, it is also used occasionally to refer to any air-cooled engine. (Don't let the Beemer guys hear you doing it! :wink: )


Arm Gaitors: Similar to Leg Gaitors, but for appendages higher up the torso ;). Not as common as they once were, due to advances in nylon rain gear that have made nylon jackets more water proof, wind resistant, cheaper, and better suited to riding. Now mostly relegated to the guys who install fiberglass insulation, who are protecting themselves from something else entirely. see Gaitors.


ATGATT: Acronym for "All The Gear; All The Time." Used as both mantra and reminder that safety gear does no good if you aren't using it. Meant to reinforce the idea that one should _never_ get on a motorcycle without utilizing every appropriate piece of protective clothing and equipment available to the rider.




A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Numerical


Last edited by Duke on Thu Feb 18, 2010 10:08 pm, edited 22 times in total.

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 Post subject: B
PostPosted: Tue Sep 12, 2006 8:25 pm 
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City: Vidalia
Backbone: The longest and straightest length of the top section of a bike's frame. That section on which the fuel tank rests. also, "spine"


Bagger: Refers to a large(r) cruiser that has been accessorized for travel with large soft saddlebags (leather, canvas, etc). While they will often include such things as fairings, trunks, etc, the term is derived from the over-sized soft saddlebags. These bikes are usually noted for ammenities related to comfort, such as larger, over-stuffed seats, backrests, etc. Similar to and often incorrectly referred to as "Dressers."


Baffles: The engineered obstructions in a muffler that serve to quiet exhaust noise.


Bar Gaitors: see Handlebar Gaitors, Gaitors.


Bar Hopper: a motorcycle that is not very comfortable on longer rides, yet lavishly styled. Rigid frames and Hardtails are commonly considered to be in this category, as well as many custom "nice to look at; unpleasant to ride" bikes.


Beemer: Yes, BMW makes motorcycles, too.


Beer Cans: Aftermarket trim pieces found primarily on large Harley Davidson cruisers, they areFork Gaitors made of metal, usually chrome plated.


Beer Tabs: A type of simple anchor point. Generally consisting of a small loop that could be used to tie off cords, hooks, etc, and a smaller loop that fastened around an existing bolt on the bike. Varying sizes and strengths for different purposes, such as tethering the bike for transport. The name arrises from their appearance. Examples can be seen here:
LINK and here: LINK 2 These items are pretty rare in today's trend of 'custom fit' and 'model specific' applications, but were once a staple of touring.


Belly Bar: The section of frame that runs under the engine. also: cradle


Belt Drive: a happy medium between the other two final drives, incorporates a rubber and kevlar belt looped around a pair of pulleys (one onthe engine and the other on the rear wheel). Less maintenance than chains but more than a shaft, tension checks/adjustments at regular intervals are the common practice. Smoother delivery than a chain but not as much as ashaft, and the belt can slip under hard acceleration. Not many metric bikes come with a belt, but they have been resurfacing in recent years.


Big Five: refers to the five major motorcycle manufacturers for the North American: Harley Davidson, Honda, Kawasaki, Suzuki, and Yamaha


Big Four: refers to the four largest manufacturers of motorcycles for the North American market, the Japanese manufacturers Honda, Kawasaki, Suzuki, and Yamaha


Big Red: Honda. Less commonly (since they were outlawed in the 80s), a model of 3-wheeled ATV Honda once produced. The precursor to the first modern 4-wheeler, the Honda FourTrax.


Biker: This is a lot easier than people think. Ask all you want, of anyone you want. Regardless of where you place your inquiry, the result is almost always "Someone just like me; all others are posers," regardless of who those 'mes' are or how different or similar they may be. So here's the deal: If you want to be a biker, fine; you're a biker. Happy christening. Ominous posthumous master cardimus; Mandibulation ex celcius, ferengi. Now sprinkle something appropriate on your head and hands; you're a biker. Congratulations.


Bikie: This really cute and cudly word is Australlian for 'Biker.' It probably loses something in translation. Also found as "Bikey," which is less visually cute, bust still has a nice cuddly ring to it.


Blueing: Term for the discoloration of chrome caused by exessive heat. Generally associated with exhaust pipes, particularly aftermarket pipes, as they usually do not posses multiple layers of tubing to protect the chrome from heat build up. The actual color of the "blueing" effect can range from yellow to orange to blue to black, with blue being the most common, given the exhaust temperatures of gasoline engines.


Board Track: In days gone by, these were small circular or oval tracks (usually indoors, but not always) made of hardwoods. Notoriously difficult to ride, as they featured tight, unbanked turns and large packs of riders choked into the comparatively narrow straights, they were eventually done away with and banned due to the extremely high mortality rate of the racers. However, this style of racing gave way to an entire genre of hot-rod, and street trackers see periodic resurgence in popularity.


Board Tracker: The machines built to race the board tracks, flat, spindly machines with long suspensions and strange rakes-- something akin to a cafe' racer with dirtbike suspension elements. The over-all design balanced the weight specifically for tailbraking, as the board track races were often one long fishtail, punctuated by straights just long enough shift a gear.


Bob: A specific form of chopping, and arguably the earliest specialized form, it is the art of shortening a bike by cutting down the size of its fenders. More radical 'Bob Jobs' may have sport a de-raked front end, shortened forks, or even have sections of the frame (usually the backbone and belly bar) removed as well.


Bobber: A bike that has been 'bobbed' (see above). Often incorrectly used to apply to "swappers."


Brake Horsepower: horsepower. A measure of the force required to accelerate a weight to a known speed in a known distance. The actual or useful horsepower of an engine, usually determined from the force exerted on a friction brake or dynamometer connected to the drive shaft.


Broomstick: Alternate term for "Drag Bars" and Steel Pipe


Bucket:1) Helmet (also "brain bucket") 2) the main body of a headlight fixture.


Buckhorns: a style of handlebar that comes up higher and sweeps towards the rider, the stance is more like holding a steering wheel in a car than a handlebar on a motorcycle. A popular style from the 1960's and 1970's and still in service today


Bungee Net: A device origanlly created for dirt bikes and marketed by the now defunct Wolf Motor Sports and sold as the Wolf Trap, this is a cargo-retaining device that is just what it sounds like: a series of elastic cords laid in a grid, diamond, octagon, or other pattern to form a net. The perimeter has a series of hooks or similar fasteners that allow it to be attached to a fender, seat, or luggage rack. Great for carrying cumbersome or oddly-shaped cargo, or even for tying additional gear to the outside of existing luggage.


Butt Flaps: see Monkey Butt





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Last edited by Duke on Fri Mar 05, 2010 8:54 pm, edited 44 times in total.

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 Post subject: C
PostPosted: Tue Sep 12, 2006 8:26 pm 
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Motorcycle: 98 Valkyrie
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Cage: Cars, pick-up trucks, etc. Four or six-wheeled vehicles. The operators ("Cagers") are "trapped" inside their rolling cages. also: casket, obstacle, rolling office, and recently (for SUVs) "gunship."


Carving: refers to hard fast cornering on roads with many curves, stems from laying the bike down to a nearly horizontal position and "carving" a line through the roadlike a knife also: Slicing; Sluicing


Catwalk: an archaic term for a particular type of wheelie, generally a prolonged one mantained for at least a small amount of distance, as opposed to a skyshot.

Chain drive: refers to the final drive which incorporates a chain with links and roller pins that transfers the power between a pair of sprockets (one on the engine and the other on the rear wheel). This is the most efficient method, but also the highest maintenance one as well.


Chemical Wrench: Slightly derogatory term for 'miracle cure' concoctions that are used by adding to the fluids of a machine for the purpose of effecting repairs or improvements to the machine without actually having to labor over the machine. While most are bunk, some are actually fairly effective within a limited scope. A short list of surprisingly effective examples include HEET, Marvel's Mystery Oil, Purple Ice, SeaFoam .


Chicken Strips: Derogatory term referring to tire wear that is considerably more advanced in the center than toward the edges. The idea is that the "Chicken Strips" prove that the rider lacks the courage or ability to hang excessively tight corners or travel excessively fast (requiring deeper leans) in the twisties. It's a backwards assumption at _best_, simply because in most street riding, excessive leaning just isn't required. Ironically, the "chicken strips" tend to indicate a machine that sees far more road time than the typical week-end ride or monthly riding club run to the Flea Market, as highways and urban surface streets generally provide plenty of opportunity for tire wear, and very little for high-speed decreasing-radius turns. Perhaps they should be more appropriately named "Commuter Strips."


Choke: A device used on a carbureted engine to change the fuel mixutre to the engine to ease starting in cold conditions. Generally, it reduces the amount of air in the mixutre. see also: "enrichener."


Chopper:Originally, any factory bike that has been extensively modified, noted for modifications to the frame itself. Generally these modifications were done for performance and to reduce the over-all weight of the bike. Now it refers to both this type of bike and custom-built bikes built or assembled by any facility not associated with a production factory or assembly line, and with the popularity of premade parts and kits and the explosion of television and pop culture coverage, it is often applied incorrectly to "swappers" styled to resemble a bike with a re-worked frame.


Clutch Surge: See "Creep," below.


Commuter Strips: See "Chicken Strips," above.


Congraduations: Thanks to everyone who has pointed out to me that this is a "typo." I'd like to set the record straight: It is _not_ a typo. It is a _pun_. Notice that this typo only occurs on the announcement of completion of schooling or course-taking or other educational endeavors? This "typo" is "Congratulations on your Graduation," _or_, "Congraduations." But thanks to all for trying to keep me "clean." ;)


Cow:1) derogatory name for any large cruiser, refers to noteably poor handling characteristics at low speed. 2) the pronounciation for "Kaw," an abreviation for a Kawasaki motorcycle


Cradle: The lower bar of the frame, which runs under the engine. Not all bikes have this; many bikes use the engine itself as a substitute stiffening member. also: "belly bar"


Creep: A generally irritating, in extreme cases dangerous, symptom of a clutch issue. Characterized by a 'pulling' in the driver train even when the clutch is open (lever pulled in). The bike might not actually travel, but a pull, or series of tugs, can be felt. Also called "Cltuch Surge" and "Torque Surge"


Crotch Rocket: Originally a generic term for all motorcycles, it has evolved into a derogatory slang term for sport bikes.


Cruiser: a newer term that surfaced in the late 1980's that refers to the laid back styled street bikes with chrome and boulevard styling. Derived from "boulevard cruiser," the first 'marketing' term for this type street machine. Prior to "Boulevard Cruiser," they had been simple "customs." Since 'Custom' has been taken to refer generally to catalogue bikes, we now call them 'cruisers.' Go figure.


Cubic Inch Wars: refers to the ongoing battle between the "Big 5" companies for the largest displacement OEM MC engine. Most prevalent in cruiser style bikes. Also called "inch wars" and "cube wars."


Curtains: Conversational slang for the valance of the fenders, most commonly seen as "Full Curtains" or "Half Curtains." also "Drapes"


Cups: Gauge Cups





A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Numerical


Last edited by Duke on Fri Mar 05, 2010 8:49 pm, edited 39 times in total.

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 Post subject: D
PostPosted: Tue Sep 12, 2006 8:27 pm 
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Displacement: the dimensional volume of an engine, in cubic centimeters (cc) or cubic inches (ci). Can be used as a rough indicator (but not a determinant) of an engine's power, but more accurately imparts the physical size and weight of the engine.

Dollar: One-hundred miles an hour. Conversational slang, as in "do the dollar" or "broke the dollar." Sometimes refered to as "the dollar mark." also: Bill, C, C-note, ton.

Drag Bars: a straight styled handlebar that does not sweep up from the risers Also: Broomstick; Steel Pipe

Drapes: Another term for the valance of the fender also "curtains."

Dresser: see Full Dresser

Dripper: Short version of "Oil Dripper"

Dry Gas: 1) Fuel System Dryer
2) Humorous reference to the mythical "powdered fuel" so many motorcyclists would have loved back in the days before gas stations every thirty minutes.

Dual Sport: a dual purpose motorcycle, made for both on and off the road travel. Sort of like a "Singer/Actress:" Dabbles in both, not really great at either one. Noteable exceptions are the Kawasaki KLR650, which is great off road, any of the BMW offerings, which really are great at both.


Dutch Double: The name given to the unusual method of two-up riding practiced by extreme homophobes. The pilot is seated as is customary, but the passenger sits completely backwards, such that (if available) he holds onto the back rest. Extremely dangerous (and stupid, but that's something else, I suppose), it allows two people to ride such that thee only physical contact is back to back (though it seems to me that their hineys are rubbing... ;) ).





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Last edited by Duke on Thu Feb 26, 2009 8:12 pm, edited 20 times in total.

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 Post subject: E
PostPosted: Tue Sep 12, 2006 8:29 pm 
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Rebel: 250
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City: Vidalia
Endo: Originally a dirtbike term, it refered to a particular stunt during which the motorcycle was stopped abruptly so as to lift the rear wheel off the ground. While the wheel was off the ground, the bike was pivoted on the front wheel and when the rear wheel was returned to the ground the motorcycle was facing the opposite direction it was at the beginning of the stunt. With the increased complexity of dirtbike stunts, this term has fallen into general disuse in favor of some truly esoteric new names. It briefly found favor amongst trick riders on sportbikes, though the amongst sportbikes the stunt generally did not involve the reversing of direction of the motorcycle. The term is not common anymore, having been replaced with the simpler and more derivative term"Stoppie"

Enrichener: The most common type of "choke" on motorcycles. Unlike a true "choke" (see above), it increases the amount of fuel in the mixture while allowing the air volume to remain the same. As there is an increase in the mass being combusted, there is an increase in internal friction, which adds an additional heat source to the 'warming up' process. While operating differently from a true "choke", for all practical purposes, it is the same thing. Enrichers tend to work more quickly than do true chokes.


Epic: A sting of sounds tossed together into a nonsensical arrangement. It bears a passing aural similarity to a word that once meant "a lengthy or involved tale involving overcoming great obstacles and adversity, usually caused (and ultimately overcome) by a character flaw in one or more of the protagonists, who will come to terms with his or their flaw(s) during the course of the tale and the story will conclude either with the protagonists changed for the better or dead because of their inability to change.

It is often incorrectly used in adjective form to imply that something is worthy of a tale that will be remembered for millennia. However, it is through this usage that the internet has managed to claim "epic" as its first victim. By seeing the word "epic" applied to both The Illyad and a grainy 72-dpi snapshot of a cat with a bow on its head and everything in between (and much, much lower), one can clearly see that today, this once-powerful piece of verbiage no longer has any meaning at all. :(





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Last edited by Duke on Mon Oct 11, 2010 12:47 am, edited 12 times in total.

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 Post subject: F
PostPosted: Tue Sep 12, 2006 8:29 pm 
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Rebel: 250
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City: Vidalia
Farkle: A term that enjoys cyclic popularity, whose origin is lost to antiquity. Like 'Squid,' many people claim different origins to it. The most reasonable seems to be the combination of "function" and "sparkle," but who knows anymore? Generally applied to refer to any over-the-top bolt-on gizmo (like a GPS that tracks you if you go to Neptune) or a coffee maker, or an electric toilet paper holder. Something that, while functional, might have been intended just to show off the excess of expense of it.


FIDO: Acronym for a life-saving skill: Forget it; Drive on. Yes; it's a skill. It must be, because it comes natural to very few people, and seems to be one of the hardest things for many people to learn. The fact is that road rage is a killer, and no matter what mystique or mythos people ascribe to motorcycles and their riders, it is these riders who are most vulnerable. Road rage is one of the leading causes of injury for riders, and has resulted in a number of deaths. Is it so important to make a big deal of some stupid thing to some fool in traffic? Someone that, left ignored, would be completely out of your life forever in ten seconds or so? Anger clouds judgment and confrontations escalate. Forget it. Drive on.

Remember, always be aware just how vulnerable a bike really is, in any situation, regardless of how macho you feel on it.



While this was simply a traffic accident, it's an eye-opening reminder that escalating road rage is never going to end well for the guy on the bike.


Flags:Mirrors

FLIBS: Acronym for "Friendly Local Independent Bike Shop;" any bike shop that is not owned by a manufacturer or run by a dealer; an independent (non-dealer or non-factory-specific) shop. See also: "Indy"

Flippers: The control levers for the clutch and front brake.

Floss: Fringe, as on much motorcycle soft luggage and riding gear

Fork Gaitors: Sleeves, usually neoprene or other soft rubber, but sometimes heavy leather, designed to cover the forks so as to keep the tubes (not the sliders, but the other part-- the skinny one ;) ) and the fork slider seals free of dust, road grime, and other debris. Some fork gaitors are made of metal, particularly on Harley Davidson touring bikes. Not to be confused with simple shields, which do not wrap around the fork completely, these metal gaitors are also called "Beer Cans." Fork gaitors are commonly seen on dirtbikes, on both the forks and the shocks (where they are called "Shock Gaitors"). Less commonly seen are leather wrapping on the shiny bits of cruiser forks intended to protect against stone dings and bug guts. See Gaitors.

Four Banger: a four cylinder engine, these are among the most powerful and smoothest motors on a motorcycle. With cars and some motorcycles, the cylinders are arranged in a straight line ("inline" or "L" four), but some motorcycles use a "V" setup, with two side-by-side cylinders on each end of the V.

Four Dinger: another term for a 4-cylinder engine

FRO (FRO Bro): Former Rebel Owner. See "FROG" below. ;)

FROG: Former Rebel Owners Group. People who had Rebels, found this site, got rid of their Rebels for various reasons, but liked this site enough to stick around anyway. Looked at another way, it's a support group for FROs. :lol:

Fuel System Dryer: A specific variety of chemical wrenches thse are additives, such as HEET,
designed to remove moisture condensate from fuel tanks and fuel lines. Preventatives against fuel tank rust-out, as water condensate is the primary cause of rust-out. Often referred to as "dry gas."

Full Dresser: A term for cruisers that are 'dressed up' like touring bikes. Meant to imply a motorcycle with a full fairing and windshield, hard saddlebags, hard trunk, and _usually- (but not always) at least a passenger backrest and floorboards. The key elements are the fairing and hard luggage. Generally these bikes feature as many 'upscale' accoutrements as possible, such as full instrumentation, etc, but they need not. Often called "Dressers" for short, and just as often incorrectly referred to as "Baggers."




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Last edited by Duke on Thu Sep 23, 2010 5:14 pm, edited 26 times in total.

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 Post subject: G
PostPosted: Tue Sep 12, 2006 8:30 pm 
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Motorcycle: 98 Valkyrie
Rebel: 250
Country: USA
State/Province: GA
City: Vidalia
Gaitors: A sleeve, generally a protective sleeve. Used to protect parts or people from abrasion, the elements, etc. See Fork Gaitors ,Leg Gaitors ,Neck Gaitors ,Bar Gaitors , Arm Gaitors and Shock Gaitors.

Gary: A term that was specific to this board, and has in recent years fallen out of use. It was used to refer to any Rebel rider from California, and stems from the earliest days of this board, when, by some wierd coincidence, every member of this board from California was named Gary. First there was one, then two, then four, then a not-Gary, then another Gary, then the not-Gary left.... It's a loving sort of pet-name, and not the unhappy kind of nickname ;)

Gary Ride: a get-together in the southern California area originally inspired by one or two of the original Garys (real "Gary" Garys, that is ;) ). The popularity of it, and perhaps the fact that there are few other Rebel-centric rides on the west-coast, and certainly the amiable nature of the participants, has propelled to become a more-or-less regular get-together. Because they've never declared an official name, Duke usually refers to it as the "Gary Ride" because it causes him to remember all the members from California over the years, and that makes him smile inside. There is usually at least one per year, sometimes more.

Gauge Cups: The small "bucket-shaped" housings of the gauges on handlebar mounted intsruments.

Geezer Glide(r): Extremely derogatory reference to big touring bikes. See Glide(r). The term implies an older rider's 'need' for excess comfort and luxury.

Get-off: also seen as "get off;" no hyphen. A euphemism for being separated from the bike during an accident. Some get-offs are intentional, but the term is specifically to reference leaving the bike due to an accident, whether getting off is intentional or not. The two types of "get-offs" are "highside" and "lowside."

Girder fork: Forks consisting of a triangular construction with points at the upper and lower triple tree and the axle, with a suspension within the tree section. These forks pivot to and fro rather than up and down. A long time favorite for extremely long rakes, they have less flex than other fork designs, but tend to weigh much more and telegraph more feedback to the rider.

Glide(r): Mildly derogatory reference to Touring bikes such as the Honda Goldwing. Originally used to refer to Harley Davidson's DuoGlide, it has come to mean any extremely large touring bike.

Gravel Inspect(or/ion): A humorous term for a particular kind of accident, usually one that involves the rider contacting the ground face first, and particularly any accident where the rider slides face down for any distance.




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Last edited by Duke on Wed Jan 21, 2009 11:12 pm, edited 23 times in total.

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 Post subject: H
PostPosted: Tue Sep 12, 2006 8:31 pm 
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Motorcycle: 98 Valkyrie
Rebel: 250
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City: Vidalia
Half-and-Half (Prize): Usually given as a door prize at a rally for something like "longest ride-in" at a pay-to-attend or "cover charge" rally or as a prize for any pay-to-enter competition at a rally or on a ride. In a nutshell, First Prize is half the cash fees collected. By tradition-- though it is not required-- the winner will keep only half the prize, splitting the other half to create Second and Third place prizes.


Handlebar Gaitors: A piece, usually leather or rubber, wrapped around the center section of the handlebars on some motorcycles. It is intended to prevent chaffing caused by key fobs on motorcycles with a top-loading ignition set, such as that used on the Honda Rebel. see Gaitors


Hardtail: a motorcycle with no rear suspension. Also: Rigid or Rigid Frame. See also: Soft Tail


HD: Harley Davidson (yes, some people have asked. Get over it; everyone has to learn from somewhere.)


Heat Sink: any interface between mediums intended to cool a device by exchanging heat from one medium to another. For example, a rectifier usually has fins on its external surface. As heat travels outward from the diodes to the fins, air passing the fins draws heat from the rectifier. A heat sink is usually identified by its design: the designs invariably maximze the surface area across which the exchange occurs. Thus, fins or fin-like designs are common, as the surface area of a set of ridges far exceeds the area of the surface on which they are mounted.


HEET: A chemical wrench, added to fuel tanks to help remove moisture and condensate. A preventative against rusted fuel tanks, as water condensation is the primary cause of tank rust-out.


Herd: Derogatory term. Used by sportbike riders or solo cruisers, it refers to a large group of riders (also "log jam," "senior cruise," or "Tour Bus"). General use, it refers to a large volume of slow-moving or stop-and-go traffic, usually non-motorcycle, but occasionally applied to pack riders, in particular packs composed primarily of cruisers.


Highside: also seen as "high side;" "high-side." Euphemism for an accident-related dismount that results in the rider being thrown into the air. See"Get-off."

High-Speed Parking Maneuver: a euphimism for a particular kind of accident, specifically one where the motorcycle (though not necessarily the rider) is brought to a stop instantly or near-instantly. Also, less commonly, any accident specifically caused by over-braking the motorcycle.


HOG: several meanings, as an acronym it stands for "Harley Owners Group," it also relates to the larger Harley Davidson models (also called "Big Twins"). Often seen as "hawg" in refference to the bikes and as a litterary affront to English majors all over the world.


Horsepower: brake horse power. A measure of the force required to accelerate a weight to a known speed in a known distance. The actual or useful horsepower of an engine, usually determined from the force exerted on a friction brake or dynamometer connected to the drive shaft.




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Last edited by Duke on Tue Jun 23, 2009 9:42 pm, edited 18 times in total.

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 Post subject: I
PostPosted: Tue Sep 12, 2006 8:31 pm 
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Motorcycle: 98 Valkyrie
Rebel: 250
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State/Province: GA
City: Vidalia
Image Rider: see Poser

Indy: any bike shop that is not owned by a manufacturer or run by a dealer; and independent shop. also: "Indie;" "FLIBS"

Iron Horse: A locomotive. An iron horse is a locomotive. No amount of coolness, misquoting, or "it sounds so totally tough" will change that. You're a couple hundred years too late; the term is completely well-turned and it means "locomotive." And don't go trying "steel horse," either. A Steel Horse is a tractor. Besides, that goofy "Dead or Alive" song made sure no one ever wanted to be caught saying "steel horse" lest someone think they were fans of the song.




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Last edited by Duke on Mon Jun 01, 2009 1:04 pm, edited 7 times in total.

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 Post subject: J
PostPosted: Tue Sep 12, 2006 8:33 pm 
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Motorcycle: 98 Valkyrie
Rebel: 250
Country: USA
State/Province: GA
City: Vidalia
Jack's: The single greatest resource in this country for Rebel Support. Technically, it's Jack's Rebel Warehouse, located in Sanford, Florida, USA.

Give him a call at [url=http://www.rebelcatalog.com]
1-800-240-0393
[/url]

Tell him you read about him here on this forum! We don't get anything, but we _do_ want him to know how much we love him and his crew! :D


Jackass: see MIKE LANCE


A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Numerical


Last edited by Duke on Wed Mar 11, 2009 9:31 am, edited 5 times in total.

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 Post subject: K
PostPosted: Tue Sep 12, 2006 8:34 pm 
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Motorcycle: 98 Valkyrie
Rebel: 250
Country: USA
State/Province: GA
City: Vidalia
Kaw(i) Pronounced "cow (cowie)." A conversational abbreviation for any motorcycle made by Kawasaki.

King and Queen: A style of seat for cruisers-- sometimes two piece, but usually one piece-- that places the passenger substantially higher than the rider, allowing even an unusually short passenger to see straight ahead over the pilot. While there are many styles of seats, both manufactured and custom, that do this, the King and Queen is noted for both its girth and its rather 'luxurious' padding, making all-day riding easy for the most tender-butted tenderfoot. An excellent example of the King and Queen seat can be seen here. Note that some of these seats elevated the passenger more than this one, and not all were as plush or wide as this example.




A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Numerical


Last edited by Duke on Wed Jan 21, 2009 11:12 pm, edited 5 times in total.

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 Post subject: L
PostPosted: Tue Sep 12, 2006 8:36 pm 
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Motorcycle: 98 Valkyrie
Rebel: 250
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City: Vidalia
Leg Gaitors: sleeves for the legs. Designed to fend off light rain or cold, they are slipped over the feet and pulled up like 80's leg warmers. Effectiveness varies by design. Generally held in place with elastic cuffs at each end, but sometimes ties or adjustable straps. The biggest convenience is tight stowage and not having to completely change riding gear when bad weather is encountered. see Gaitors.


Liquid Cooled: any engine that is cooled by fluid running through a radiator. Many liquid cooled V-twins (and some V-4s) will hide the radiator and use cosmetics to conceal the liquid-cooled nature of the engine. This is purely aesthetic. Not all Liquid Cooled engines are cooled by water; many are cooled by running the motor oil through a heat exchanger of some sort.


Lowside: also seen as "Low side;" "Low-side." A euphemism for any accident resulting in the rider leaving the bike and sliding on the ground. Arguably the safest way to leave a moving machine, it's still not good. See"Get-off."


LPSL: Anachronim for "Loud Pipes Save Lives;" the rather dubious argument in support of exhaust noise levels that violate the very same laws that loud pipe owners want enforced on car stereos. To date, only annecdotal evidence supports this theory; the sparse amount of actual research done, while not in abundance, soundly refutes it.


Lub(bing) Alternate form of 'Lug(ging),' named for the characteristic sound of an engine nearing stall speed.


Lug(ging) running the engine in too high a gear, resulting in dangerously low RPM. Can cause stalling, jerking, shuddering, and valve damage


Lump: Complete engine/tranny combination. Not necessarily in running condition, but generally complete. Most often used to refer to the engine as a separate component, as in one that has been or will be removed from the bike.




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Last edited by Duke on Wed Jan 21, 2009 11:13 pm, edited 7 times in total.

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 Post subject: M
PostPosted: Tue Sep 12, 2006 8:37 pm 
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Joined: Jul 25, 2003
Motorcycle: 98 Valkyrie
Rebel: 250
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State/Province: GA
City: Vidalia
MBS: Multiple Bike Syndrome. A psychological condition that results in collecting-- hoarding!-- motorcycles. Many reasons exist: spare parts, specific purposes, aesthetic appreciation, etc. Left unchecked, it can grow to financially crippling levels. ;)

MIKE LANCE: A jackass; a buffoon. An arrogant moron. Someone who's been stewing in the funk of his soiled diapers so long that he no longer thinks it smells bad. Granted, this has had certain detrimental affects to both his intelligence and his people skills. Mike Lance-- a customer service guy from Cobra (seller of aftermarket motorcycle accessories) was once asked how a part listed for the Rebel could function on a Rebel, when the electrical demands for the part as-listed far exceeded the Rebel's ability to produce electricity.

The questioner asked a valid, _non-snide_ question. To paraphrase:

"How does this work?"

To which Mike Lance replied:

Mike Lance, of Cobra customer service wrote:
If the lightbar would not work on the Rebel, Cobra would not make the lightbar for the bike.


it can all be found here: http://rebel250.com/rebelforum/viewtopic.php?t=19302&start=20

Gotta love that! :lol: If nothing else, Mike Lance has secured for himself the position of "Dudeman of Customer Service, Forever and Ever, Amen." He even managed to get in ahead of those computer tech support guys with the intelligibly-accented english whose only advice boils down to "jiggle the handle 'till it quits running."

You go, Mike! :lol:

What a MIKE LANCE... :roll:


Mill: Engine. Also "power plant."

Mod(s): Modifications

Monkey Bars: term that is occasionally applied to Ape Hangers, though this term is also used to refer to a particular type of Girder Fork characterized by extensive ladder-like bracing. also: "Ape Hooks"

Monkey Butt: An unpleasant, often painful sensation in the backside associated with long periods of riding, particularly in a single position. Contributing factors include poor seat padding or weight distribution, sweating, no change in position, a "non-breathing" seat cover, and even some clothing choices. Symptoms range from redness and irritation to bruising and in rare instances blisters on the backside. Best bet is to avoid it; once it begins, it worsens with any attempt to alleviate it.

For more on Monkey Butt, look here:
LINK
also "Swamp Butt," "Butt Flaps"

Muffler: A device in the exhaust system designed to reduce the amount of noise produced by a running engine. Pretty straight-forward, hunh? ;)



A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Numerical


Last edited by Duke on Wed Mar 11, 2009 9:39 am, edited 13 times in total.

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 Post subject: N
PostPosted: Tue Sep 12, 2006 8:37 pm 
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Joined: Jul 25, 2003
Motorcycle: 98 Valkyrie
Rebel: 250
Country: USA
State/Province: GA
City: Vidalia
Neck: the front of a motorcycle frame, where the steering head is located. also Steering neck, goose neck, and (correctly) steering housing.

Neck Gaitors: Sleeve-like scarf designed to protect the rider's neck from cold and rain. Range in styles, and often incorporate a dickie to go over the jacket (or under it, if you want to wick rain onto your chest), and sometimes a chin pocket to allow the gaitor to be pulled over the mouth, nose and cheeks. see Gaitors.

Nipple Surfing: self explanatory, refers to sliding across the ground face down after falling off a motorcycle


Numberous: Much like "Congraduations," this is not a typo. It is a _pun_. But thanks to all who are trying to keep me straight ;)



A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Numerical


Last edited by Duke on Wed Jan 21, 2009 11:23 pm, edited 7 times in total.

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 Post subject: O
PostPosted: Tue Sep 12, 2006 8:38 pm 
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Motorcycle: 98 Valkyrie
Rebel: 250
Country: USA
State/Province: GA
City: Vidalia
OEM: an acronym, "Original Equipment Manufacturer," refers to parts or components designed to replicate the form, function, and quality of those used to originally assemble the bike or components by the manufacturer of the original, factory-installed parts. Parts not by the original manufacturer are referred to as "aftermarket".

OEM Gas: not something you're likely to hear, unless you opt to help spread it around. Coined by our own Shadow Shack, it's a derogatory reference to "outgrowing" a motorcycle before riding it even remotely near enough to gain any practical experience or skills:
Quote:
Great bike; low miles! Tires in A-1 shape, fresh oil and OEM gas in tank!


OOG (O.O.G.): Acronym: Out Of Gas.

OOG Error: Generally used to refer to being stranded on the road due to lack of fuel

OOG Pilot Error: Being stranded beside the road due to lack of fuel and having undertaken steps to remedy the situation (phone call, tow truck, friend with a bottle headed into town) only to discover that the bike is, in fact, _not_ out of gas, but merely needs to be flipped to reserve.

Oil Cooled: A liquid-cooled engine that regulates the engine temperature by running the engine oil through a radiator-like heat exchanger.

Oil Cooler: A heat-exchanger, very much like a small radiator, though which the engine oil circulates. As air passers through the exchanger, it absorbs heat from the oil.

Oil Dripper: slang/derogatory term, refers to the earlier American and British bikes and often still used towards the modern ones

Old School: The correct spelling of the term 'old skool.' Just for the record, "old skool" is in fact both a rap music term that has nothing to do with motorcycles _and_ very much 'new skool,' what with this spelling having emerged on the scene shortly after the movive "Boys in the Hood." The motorcycle 'slang' term "Old School" refers to style elements popular in the hey-day of choppers, noteably the 60s and 70s, meaning that even when used 'correctly,' it is still grossly incorrect. The continous use of the term "Old Skool" for anything outside rap music has lead to an entire generation that believes you pluralize a word by adding a 'Z'....




A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Numerical


Last edited by Duke on Sun Oct 03, 2010 12:44 pm, edited 11 times in total.

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 Post subject: P
PostPosted: Tue Sep 12, 2006 8:39 pm 
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Motorcycle: 98 Valkyrie
Rebel: 250
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State/Province: GA
City: Vidalia
PARALLEL TWIN: an inline 2 cylinder engine. Both cylinders sit side by side, as opposed to a "V" twin.


Pedal(s) Foot pegs. Also the end of the control lever for the rear brake. Less commonly, the control levers for the rear brake and the shifter.


Pegs: The little thingies you put your feet on so as to keep them both off the ground and in position to work the lower control levers.


Perch(es): The bosses on the handlebar control collars that mount the mirror stems and the hand levers. Archaically:Foot pegs.


Petcock: The valve on the underside of the gas tank through which the fuel flows. Used to regulate and stop fuel flow.


Pick-up Ride: A type of group or pack ride, this one is completely unorganized and informal. Generally, the happen on their own, when riders begin 'falling in' with other riders, with riders continuing to fall in or out as the group travels. No provisions for communication are made; no promises for support, no planned route, etc. Occasionally a pick-up ride may be planned, in as much as "starting at x location at y time and ending when we get to z," but this is about as formal as they get.


Pillion: back seat or passenger seat of a two-piece motorcycle seat. Single-piece seats have front and rear positions, but it is the simple "square pylon of foam" design of the rear seat on early two-piece set-ups that give rise to the name. Amongst cruiser riders (pillions are found exclusively on cruisers), it can also refer to the passenger.


Plug Chop: A method of more accurately reading the fuel mixture at higher RPM ("at speed"). Most folks understand the importance of reading plugs as an indicator of fuel mixture and effectiveness of burn, but most folks don't realize that this is only accurate for low RPM and idle ranges.

To do a plug chop, gather spark plug removal tools and stash them on the bike. With the bike at operating temperature, run down the road at an even speed and RPM for a couple of miles, then pull the clutch while simultaneously killing the engine. It's important to not let the RPM change:

As the engine slows, the fuel mixture leans radically. This is one of the reasons that a standard plug read won't tell you much about your high-range fuel burn. At idle, of course, the mixture is also different, running a different circuit of the carb.

Stop the bike as quickly as possible, remove the plugs and read them. Reinstall them again before the engine or the plugs have the chance to cool.

It's that simple. ;)


PLP: Parking Lot Practice. The self-training routine that uses large and preferably empty areas of pavement to test and improve skills with the various techniques used to control the motorcycle. Popular practices (which almost require no-traffic and roomy places) are weaving, tight turns, and panic-stops.


Po'/Poor Boy Pull: A technique of days gone by for 'finding' fuel when a rider was stranded, out of money, or the streets had rolled up. Fuel pumps used to cut off at the nozzle, and the back pressure would shut the pump off. Thus, by putting the nozzle in the tank and squeezing it, the pressure in the hose could discharge up to and sometimes over half-a-pint of gas. Old glass-bubble pumps might contain up to a quart of fuel in the hose, but it was not pressurized. Thus, the rider would pull the hose as high as he could at the pump end and 'work' the fuel toward the nozzle.
The frequency of all-night fuel stations has made this desperation theft unnecessary, and the very existence of modern fuel pumping systems has made it impossible. Merely knowing what it is is simply a sign of being older than the guy you're talking to.


Poser: A derogatory term inferring that a rider bought his motorcycles for reasons other than enjoying the ride, perhaps as a trendy fashion statement. Again, it's derogatory; Don't use it here or someone will be offended. (Trust me)


Poseur: see Poser


Power Plant: Engine. Used to suggest an engine of unusual strength.


Puke Can: A reservoir on old Harleys. A very common problem with these engines was the constant slinging of oil and fumes from the top end, which would get all over the rider and the bike. The solution was the addition of a collector bolted to the engine to gather condensate fumes from the engine. It needed to be drained routinely. The nature of the problem and the design of the collector lead to the term "Puke Can."




A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Numerical


Last edited by Duke on Mon Jan 18, 2010 1:01 am, edited 11 times in total.

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 Post subject: Q
PostPosted: Tue Sep 12, 2006 8:40 pm 
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Motorcycle: 98 Valkyrie
Rebel: 250
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State/Province: GA
City: Vidalia
Nope; got nothing for Q. At least, not yet. Well, some derisive comments about leather fringe, but really; that's not what we're about here, is it?




A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Numerical


Last edited by Duke on Wed Jan 21, 2009 11:14 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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 Post subject: R
PostPosted: Tue Sep 12, 2006 8:45 pm 
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Motorcycle: 98 Valkyrie
Rebel: 250
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City: Vidalia
Rake: One of two measurements that determine handling characteristics of a motorcycle. See Trail below for more information

Raps: RPM; also used to refer to the act of revving the engine up and down repeatedly. When used singularly ("rap"), it indicates a single short-ish burst of throttle held momentarily at high RPM.

Ratchet: A good multi-purpose, onomatapoetic word used descriptively: 1) a particular type of hand tool. 2) the gear shifter 3) the act of racing through the gears rapidly, either up or down; 4) grinding a gear with a missed shift, particularly if the grind is excessively long or difficult to recover from.

Revs: RPM; also used to refer to the "upper" end of an engine's potential speed as a generalization, such as in "keeping it in the revs" or the "rev zone." Also: "raps;" "RPM"

Rice Burner: slang term for a Japanese made motorcycle. Oddly, German bikes are not called "kraut burners" or "Jew burners" and American bikes are not considered to run on tooth decay, bad grooming habits, and store-bought lifestyles.

Rigid or Rigid Frame: The actual technical term for a "hardtail" motorcycle frame, this type of motorcycle features a frame that has no swingarm. Thus, the rear axle is mounted fixedly to the frame without the benefit of a suspension. This is generally accomplished by extending the spine downward until it meets the frame sections through which the axle is mounted. The ride on these machines is brutal and unpleasant without significant ergonomic considerations. See also: Soft Tail

Road Rage: We all know what this is, and I won't insult anyone by defining it here. It should be noted, however, that it is the number 3 killer of motorcyclists. Be careful what you do in traffic.

Road Rash: abrasion wounds left behind on a biker's body after falling down while moving.

RPM: Acronym for Revolutions per Minute. A measurement of engine speed, it is an indication of how many complete rotations of the crankshaft occur in one minute.

RUB: Acronym for Rich Urban Biker. A term that came to be in the 80s, when HD was trying to remake its image and appear more 'Republican Friendly.' It's original meaning refered to succesful upper-middle class or higher status people who bought a motorcycle as escapism; these folks often tried to dress down, act tough, and generally reflect the fictitious lifestyle of the 'outlaw biker.' Today, it is less offensive or insulting, but still a degredation. Today it refers primarily to folks who ride casually, on the weekend, or just around town. also: Weekender; Pleasure Cruiser




A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Numerical


Last edited by Duke on Wed Jan 21, 2009 11:14 pm, edited 14 times in total.

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