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 Post subject: not ready yet ... but working on it
PostPosted: Mon Nov 01, 2004 10:25 pm 
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Joined: Jul 25, 2003
ATTENTION, PLEASE:

[The originator and custodian of this index, MillenniumRebel, has asked me to put a note here to help him fend off the barage of complaints about the dead links in this index. I am happy to do so, considering the amount of work he has put into it.

Some time ago, we had a serious recurring server problem. The bulk of the issue was being caused by the massive amount of space this forum had grown to consume on the server. There were numerous compression, storage, retrieval, and other issues I can't begin to understand. The short version is this:
A massive automated culling was instituted, and a large chunk of old threads were lost in the process. Many of these links may refer to some of those now-gone threads.

This is not MR's fault; it is an unfortunate side-effect of a serious problem. However, as this project is MR's personal project, I would think that he would appreciate a simple notification of any bad links anyone might find. But there's little to be gained insulting him for falling down on the job when the problem not only was not his devising, but was completely beyond his control.

Thanks.

---Duke ]




place marker only
not for commentary please

==========================


How-to buy a USED BIKE


OIL
How-to change 250
Synth -vs- Dino / Moto -vs- Auto


AIR INTAKE
Filter ..... also, filter discussion thread
Breather vent tubes/drain
Air box Side Cover

CARBS / FUEL
Fitting an alternate tank (450 specific, but good info for ideas)
Fuel line filter
Carb Cleaning & Parts Diagram
Reading Spark Plugs
Shimming Carb Needle
Adjusting the Carb Mixture Setting



EXHAUST / PIPES
Baffles - Drilling - Loudness
Blue/gold discoloration
aftermarket

HANDLEBARS / CONTROLS
Adjusting Bars / risers
Grips
Levers
Cables
Forward Controls
Windsheilds

LIGHTING/ELECTRICAL
Headlight Buzz
Auxillary Lighting
Marker Lights
3 Point BrakeLight Pattern
Rebel 250 wiring diagram
Testing Relays and Relay Harnesses/wiring circuits

ADDITIONAL ELECTRICAL INDEX
Index

SaddleBags
Fork Bags

Seats
Seat Removal
Passenger Pillion Pad(upgrades, changes, etc...)


Brakes



Specifications
Redline
etc
etc


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Last edited by MillenniumRebel on Sun Oct 09, 2005 8:23 pm, edited 13 times in total.

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 Post subject: Re: not ready yet ... but working on it
PostPosted: Sun Jan 30, 2005 9:36 am 
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Joined: Jul 25, 2003
http://rebel250.com/rebelforum/viewtopic.php?t=29
MillenniumRebel wrote:
below are links to some threads explaining some modifications to the rebels ...

DISCLAIMER: be aware that trying to duplicate these may put your engine at risk unless you are confident you know what you are doing and have the skills to correct errors or problems that may arise ... there is also no gaurantee that the people who posted these know anything about what they may be doing either ....

=====

TANK STRAP
http://www.angelfire.com/rebellion2/mil ... Strap.html

GRIP REPLACEMENT
http://www.angelfire.com/rebellion2/mil ... Grips.html

AUXILLARY LIGHTING
http://www.angelfire.com/rebellion2/mil ... hting.html

LOUDER HORN UPGRADE
http://www.angelfire.com/rebellion2/mil ... lHorn.html

LED 3 POINT BRAKE LIGHT ADDITION
http://www.angelfire.com/rebellion2/mil ... ights.html
http://vlx.roeiboot.com/reflector/reflector.html

AIR FILTER SUBSTITUTION
http://forums.delphiforums.com/n/mb/mes ... &msg=101.1
http://www.angelfire.com/rebellion2/mil ... ilter.html

HYPERCHARGER MODIFICATION
http://rebel250.com/rebelforum/viewtopic.php?t=2862
http://www.sa750.com/hypercharger/hypercharger2.htm

FUEL FILTER ADDITION
http://forums.delphiforums.com/n/mb/mes ... l&msg=79.1

REAR SPROCKET CHANGE
http://forums.delphiforums.com/n/mb/mes ... rs&msg=3.1

RUBBER MOUNTING THE ENGINE
http://forums.delphiforums.com/n/mb/mes ... rs&msg=9.1

THROTTLE/CARB GOVENOR BYPASS
http://forums.delphiforums.com/n/mb/mes ... s&msg=11.1

3 DEGREE TIMING ADVANCE
http://forums.delphiforums.com/n/mb/mes ... s&msg=10.1

TINY TACH
http://rebel250.com/rebelforum/viewtopic.php?t=3167
http://rebel250.com/rebelforum/viewtopic.php?t=1840
http://rebel250.com/rebelforum/viewtopic.php?t=2730
Alternate hookup : Quick Release method
http://rebel250.com/rebelforum/viewtopic.php?t=3184

BIKE LOWERING by Duke
http://www.angelfire.com/rebellion/mill ... yDuke.html

HEADLIGHT BUZZ FIX
http://www.angelfire.com/rebellion2/mil ... htFix.html

FLOORBOARDS from Jack's
http://www.angelfire.com/rebellion/mill ... board.html

Old Road Dog's DIY projects
FLOORBOARDS
http://www.mybestyet.net/~tedowens/publ ... lrbrds.htm
SHIFTER PEG MOD
http://www.mybestyet.net/~tedowens/publ ... hftbig.htm
HEEL TOE SHIFTER MOD
http://www.mybestyet.net/~tedowens/publ ... eeltoe.htm


=====
http://www.angelfire.com/rebellion2/mil ... jects.html
http://www.angelfire.com/rebellion/mill ... Links.html



Bringing a bike back to life ...

http://rebel250.com/rebelforum/viewtopic.php?t=1015

http://rebel250.com/rebelforum/viewtopic.php?t=160

http://rebel250.com/rebelforum/viewtopic.php?t=351

http://rebel250.com/rebelforum/viewtopic.php?t=441

http://rebel250.com/rebelforum/viewtopic.php?t=786

http://rebel250.com/rebelforum/viewtopic.php?t=710

http://rebel250.com/rebelforum/viewtopic.php?t=1657

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 Post subject: Re: not ready yet ... but working on it
PostPosted: Sun Feb 20, 2005 10:13 pm 
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Joined: Jul 25, 2003
Quote:
Best way to haul bike?

Posted By: Linzicat <Linzicat@hotmail.com>
Date: Wednesday, 23 July 2003, at 8:06 p.m.

I'm getting ready to bring my bike back with me one weekend coming up from my parents house. Can't exactly ride it back as I need my truck with me too. My question is, do any of you guys/gals ever haul your bikes in the bed of a truck? If so, what's the best way to load it and with what kind of ramp? My Dad has a big ramp (made for his 4 wheeler) and I just about feel through the open slats in it trying to load the bike in his truck when taking it in to the shop there. As I don't know many people in this town yet I'd probably be loading by myself. I'd thought about investing in a trailer but living at an apartment I don't really have a place to store it. Any suggestions or perhaps any don'ts?



Quote:
Re: Best way to haul bike?

Posted By: Duke <dukebushido@aol.com>
Date: Thursday, 24 July 2003, at 5:26 a.m.

In Response To: Best way to haul bike? (Linzicat)

Okay, a few ideas.

If you have help getting up the ATV ramps your father has, then you have no real problem getting loaded.

When you tie down, do NOT tie to the handlebars. You can bend them, or worse, slip them in the risers so that they can't be tightened and will flop and roll forever (I think we have all seen that kid with the bicycle bars that flopped down every time he pulled on them....).

I prefer to tie off either to the lower tree or around the frame in front of the tank. Tieing to the tree helps to prevent fork-flop (so does loading the bike at an angle so that the front wheel is poked into a corner). Be sure that the forks can't turn when you are done.

Make sure that the bike is straight up and down and remains so as you tighten the straps. I always pull the bike down until the suspension is fully compressed. This way, the suspension cannot further compress hitting a bump or hole. If the suspension compresses, then the straps are just a bit looser; the bike has a chance to shift.

I know a lot of folks who say that they do not tie down that hard because of the constant pressure on the fork seals while it is travelling. My own take on that is that the seals are under pressure when the bike is sitting still, too. And having disassembled a few forks and seen the construction of them, I can't believe that the pressure suddenly becomes explosive. Yes, this is a more constant pressure than they are expected to endure, but still.

All I can really say is that I have never once suffered seal damage or shock damage from pulling the suspension fully compressed. And even if and when I do, I would far prefer replacing seals to losing the bike over the side. Let's see; cost of two seals and labor time (usually my own) versus totaled bike and damage to truck.... Hmmm...)

Make sure that your forward straps are pulling down and forward (most pickups anymore have anchor points in each corner, so this should not be a problem). Make sure your rear straps are pulling down and rearward. If your straps are pulling straight down, the bike can shift a small amount forward or backward. Angling the staps lets the straps pull against each other and reduces this chance.

On the rear, I again prefer to tie to the frame: usually under the seat (if feasable) near the upper shock mount. (I have never had to pull a softail, so I don't know what I would do then until it happens.) Again, I compress all the travel out of the suspension.

This is the method that I use. If it does not sound like what you want to do, then by all means do something else. You may feel more confident doing something else.

As far as unloading:

Where you are going: is there a bike shop there? Most bike shops (especially independants) have really big, really nice, permanent ramps for loading and unloading bikes. It is a convenience for their customer (and themselves, if they offer a retreival service). Or for that matter, There may be one in the town you are leaving that you could use to load the bike.

barring that, if you know anyone who could drive your truck after you unload, many tool rental places rent loading ramps for a dollar or two an hour. If you go to one and pay the minimum price, they may let you unload right there in the parking lot. There is a chance that a friendly staff may not even charge you. (a really friendly staff may even help a lady unload her bike!)

My sister moved to Texas a few years back, and never had to touch her bike except to untie it. MY brother and I (this was before my spine thing, obviously) picked it up into her truck and tied it in. When she got to Texas, she drove to Lowe's (yeah, the home improvement store!). She got a couple of the big guys that load things into cars for customers, gave them each five bucks (this was a few years ago; five bucks was a sit-down lunch) and a cold Coke from her cooler and they lifted it out for her.

You may find similar friendly folk at any place that hires really big guys.

Good luck!

Duke



also see how-to pages at ...

http://www.chariot-trailer.com/index.ph ... &Itemid=43

http://www.herberts.org/wayne/valk/tiedown.htm

http://www.ridemyown.com/articles/techn ... ring.shtml

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 Post subject: Re: not ready yet ... but working on it
PostPosted: Fri Mar 04, 2005 12:47 pm 
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Joined: Mar 9, 2004
http://rebel250.com/rebelforum/viewtopic.php?t=3557
powerroy wrote:
Here is a great post concerning buying and properly sizing a helmet.

http://totalmotorcycle.com/BBS/viewtopi ... sc&start=0

Very well written. Be safe.

I found this on another forum, very good info


Last edited by MillidumRabble on Fri Mar 04, 2005 10:12 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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 Post subject: Re: not ready yet ... but working on it
PostPosted: Fri Mar 04, 2005 10:38 pm 
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Joined: Jul 25, 2003
PIPES - loud etc ...

http://forum.motorcycle-usa.com/default ... 18&m=46752


http://rebel250.com/rebelforum/viewtopic.php?t=852

http://rebel250.com/rebelforum/viewtopic.php?t=2667

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 Post subject: Re: not ready yet ... but working on it
PostPosted: Fri Mar 04, 2005 10:46 pm 
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Joined: Jul 25, 2003
OIL ... Synth -vs- Dino ... Moto -vs- Auto ...

http://rebel250.com/rebelforum/viewtopic.php?t=2995

http://rebel250.com/rebelforum/viewtopic.php?t=2805

http://rebel250.com/rebelforum/viewtopic.php?t=54

http://rebel250.com/rebelforum/viewtopic.php?t=536

http://rebel250.com/rebelforum/viewtopic.php?t=1045

http://rebel250.com/rebelforum/viewtopic.php?t=1139

http://rebel250.com/rebelforum/viewtopic.php?t=694
additives

http://rebel250.com/rebelforum/viewtopic.php?t=1654

http://rebel250.com/rebelforum/viewtopic.php?t=3287
NOTE: mobil-1 red cap has been re-named and re-packaged
http://rebel250.com/rebelforum/viewtopic.php?t=3391

http://rebel250.com/rebelforum/viewtopic.php?t=1791

http://rebel250.com/rebelforum/viewtopic.php?t=1858
but be sure to read the warnings about MMO as well FIRST tho
http://rebel250.com/rebelforum/viewtopic.php?t=2937

and on a lighter note
http://bongo.www8.50megs.com/oil_change.htm

==================================

http://rebel250.com/rebelforum/viewtopic.php?t=3836
MillenniumRebel wrote:
repackaged ..... near as i can tell .....

Mobil-1 (red cap) ..... is now ..... Mobile-1 (gold cap)

Image


MillenniumRebel wrote:
CAUTION
i think i may have a clue as to what happened with that report of mobil red cap doing a number on the clutch

Image

note i didn't say mobil-ONE ....
the NEW packaging has the red cap on somthing different now (see pic on left)
the OLD mobil-ONE recap is on right for comparision (it is NOW gold cap)

anyhoo ... the new redcapp 50000 thing is cheaper and as i was in a rush and had limited funds in my pocket i just grabbed a couple bottles of the 10w40 (after checking the bottom of the api circle was clear)

i guess this is one of those exceptions that prove the rule
because my clutch started acting up the next day while riding

being mindful of that one bad report from earlier - i immediately went and got a couple green bottles of quaker state 10w40 and did another oil change

that seems to have cleared the problem up

so WARNING

mobil-ONE red cap is the old version of the 'good stuff'
it has NOW been repackaged as mobil-ONE gold cap

there is a NEW red cap on the market and it is apparently 'bad stuff' for clutches

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Last edited by MillenniumRebel on Fri Oct 21, 2005 3:32 pm, edited 2 times in total.

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 Post subject: Re: not ready yet ... but working on it
PostPosted: Sat Mar 05, 2005 12:23 am 
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Joined: Mar 9, 2004
Advice for carrying PASSENGERS for the first time:

Your FIRST Passenger - NOT your Lady or Child article by James R. Davis

Take a Friend Riding article by Chuck Hawks

Pre-Ride Briefing article by James R. Davis

TIPS for the PASSENGER article by Chuck Hawks

Passengers are NOT Helpless article by James R. Davis


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 Post subject: Re: not ready yet ... but working on it
PostPosted: Tue Mar 08, 2005 1:48 pm 
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Joined: Aug 27, 2003
Duke wrote:
This thread should give you some ideas:

Clock Ideas for the Bikes

Any time you wonder something, click the search link at the top of the page. Someone else may have wondered it, too :wink: .


Lots of ideas and answers on this board, and ten times as many opinions.



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 Post subject: Re: not ready yet ... but working on it
PostPosted: Tue Apr 26, 2005 8:26 am 
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Joined: Mar 9, 2004
gear shifter lever adjustment

http://rebel250.com/rebelforum/viewtopic.php?t=4036


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 Post subject: Re: not ready yet ... but working on it
PostPosted: Tue Apr 26, 2005 4:23 pm 
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Forum Administrator

Joined: Jul 25, 2003
Motorcycle: 98 Valkyrie
Rebel: 250
Country: USA
State/Province: GA
City: Vidalia
Starter motor/starter clutch :
Duke wrote:
The starter itself is hyper-simple.

You can most likely disassemble it yourself and repair it.

Suggestions, if you do decide to do that:

First, take your magic marker and draw a line down one side, from end to end. This will help you line everything back up so that you don't spend an hour fighting with the through-bolts.

Second, remove the nut where the power supply wire attaches to the starter completely. If there is more than one, remove them both. They act as jam nuts for the brush rack, and you'll have a time getting apart without breaking the rack if you don't remove the nuts.

When you open the starter up, do so carefully! There will most likely be a varying number of thrust washers (used to align the armature) on one or both ends of the armature. Check the Drive End housing and the Commutator end housing to be sure that none have stuck inside to fall out when you aren't expecting it. Often, these washers are of several sizes (as a note, I want to mention that the presence, size, and location of these washers will vary from unit to unit-- they are to 'perfect' each starter individually), so it is important to note which ones went on which end. Use your marker for this.

If the motor or starter clutch isn't locked up, odds are the armature isn't bent. But if it is burned up (and believe me, you will smell it if it is!), then check it for shorts to the commutator (the ring of copper bars at one end). Personally, I do this with a lamp and cord rather than an ohm meter, simply because often carbon dust from the brushes will give a false positive for shorts, and a good load of 120v will burn the dust out almost instantly.

Inspect the armature. Are there signs that it has been 'dragging'? Indications of dragging are usually gouges or wear marks in the stacks (the metal ridges through which the copper windings are laid). If so, you will most likely need to replace the needle bearings or bushings in the End Frames.

Check the stakes-- the points at which the bars to the commutator are fastened to the windings of the armature. If you see evidence of a slung bar-- places where it appears that solder is missing or burned, clean the stake and resolder with a heavy high-temp solder (I find a propane torch invaluable for this). Make sure to solder just the one stake at a time-- don't bridge the bars with wasted solder.

If the armature isn't shorted, and there is no damage to the commutator, then simply polish the armature (emory cloth or very fine sandpaper works fine if you don't have a lathe) and set it aside. If the Commutator is badly damaged-- missing bars and such, or the armature is shorted and you cannot find and repair the short, you will have to replace the starter. The aftermarket does not yet provide armatures for motorcycle starters.

Clean the brush rack; degreaser or even WD-40 is fine for this. DON'T LOSE THE SPRINGS! They are not available from any supplier, anywhere. The only source of new springs is a complete brushrack or another starter!

Inspect the brush rack. Feel free to fit it to the armature if you are uncertain about brush length. Study the brushes. When fitted to the armature, are the brushes so long that their leads are at least half-way from the end of the little slots they ride in? (This is only for side-lead brushes, of course. If you have end-lead brushes, you will need to make sure that the brush itself is long enough that it fills more than half of its holder when the rack is fitted to the armature.) If not, you will want to replace the brushes.

Inspect the rack. Is it unbroken? Are the brush leads burnt or badly discolored? Are the insulators the positive brush(es) cracked or burned? Does the lead from the power supply line make contact with the field case, or it its insulation intact?.

If you don't like the look of the brush rack, replace it. It is possible to get a loaded brush rack--the brushes already installed.

Wash out the field case (the cylinder with the magnets in it). Carb cleaner, degreaser, or even soapy water are fine. Let it dry completely. While it drys, inspect the magnets closely. Are any of them cracked or missing pieces? If so, can you find the pieces? Believe it or not, you can super glue them back into place! These are rare earth magnets, and as such are very brittle. This is why you NEVER tap on a starter to see if you can get it to crank. If the magnets are badly broken up or you can't find all the pieces of small breaks, you will have to replace the starter. The aftermarket does not provide these magnets (yet) for small starters.

If your starter uses field coils (steel pole shoes bolted to the inside of the field case with copper windings wrapped around them), you will want to check it for shorts. Simply enough, you will want to see if there exists a short between the positive brush(es) and the case itself. If there is no short, then you need only to carefully wash out the case (carefully, so you do not remove the wrappings around the coils and thus cause a short) and let it dry. If there is a short, inspect it to see if you can find it. It may be as simply as lost insulation around a positive brush lead. Odds are, though, that it will be in the field coils themselves. Carefully remove the pole shoes (mark them 'this end up,' as on many starters it makes a difference)-- you will need an impact screwdriver for this-- and gently remove and inspect the coils. If needbe, remove and re-wrap the coils with coil paper. (in a pinch, a single layer of electrician's tape works well, as does a LOOSELY APPLIED double or triple layer of 3/4 inch masking tape. I say loosely applied as the pole shoes will pull against it when you go to re-tighten them, and you cannot let it tear. Replace the pole shoes, and make sure that they are TIGHT so as to prevent them from dragging on the armature.If you cannot repair the short, you will have to replace the starter, as the aftermarket etc etc etc... on the plus side, odds are you will have a magnet case, as that has been used almost exclusively on all but the largest bikes for many years now. You will know by looking at the starter. If the field case has big screws around the center of it, you have field coils. If it doesn't, you have magnets. (For what it's worth, you can bang on a coil-type starter all you want, as long as you don't bend or dent it.)

Inspect the bushings (or needle bearings) in the End Frames. If the bearings look good, apply a light dose of lithium grease or very soft high-temp bearing grease and set them aside. If they look worn or damaged, replace them. If your starter has bushings, then check them for fit on the armature shaft. Check in particular that they go on freely, but do not have excess play on the shaft. If your armature showed signs of dragging, regardless if it had bearings or bushings, replace them.

When everything meets with your approval, reassemble the starter, taking great pains to put it back together as you found it. Start from the front and work backwards. When you get to the brush rack, you will have completely forgotten wich way was up: the side with the brushes on it faces _down_ toward the bulk of the armature. The base of the rack is grounded against the Commutator End Frame. I personally but a little dab or dielectric grease around each of the screwholes that are used to secure the rack to the End Frame. Believe it or not, an improved ground will help prolong the life of the brushes.

Put the CE Frame back on the starter, make sure that everything is lined up, and put the starter back on the bike (most bikes use the through bolts as mounting bolts also. If yours doesn't, then tighten them up and test the starter before re-installing it.

While we use an actual load test bench at the shop, there is an easy backyard way to test a starter, but you will need a bench vice and some jumper cables and a car battery and a broomhandle or wooden hammer handle that you have no great love for.

Secure the starter in the vice and use the cables to groung the starter body to the battery. Fasten a lead to the positive wire attaching stud on the starter (trust me; you want the lead there!). Have a friend or random sucker touch the positive cable to the lead. There will be a pop or two, and maybe some sparks, and he will jump out of his skin. Don't worry about it. It's normal when you do it this way. (aren't you glad you used the lead and didn't arc the threads off of the stud?!)

The starter will begin to spin immediately. Listen to see if it starts out strong, or if it has to build up to speed. If it has to build up to speed, then you will need to make some adjustments. (on another note, don't let it run more than about thirty seconds at a time like this-- the commutator will heat up and sling solder if you overheat the starter.) To adjust it, loosen (only a small amount) the through bolts and lightly tap the End Frames, one at a time, sideways. The goal here is to slightly alter the angle of the armature, as it is most likely dragging. Retest the starter. When it is working properly, re-tighten the bolts.

Now for the final test-- with the starter secure in the vice and your partner spinning the starter, take your broom stick and lean the side of it (not the end!) against the starter and try to stop the starter. If you could stop it without having to lean into it, you've done something wrong-- most likely there is one or more brushes making poor contact or a short in the armature or field coils. Open it back up and re-inspect it.



Now I know this sounds like a lot, but it really isn't. Except for the drying times, this whole operation can be done in under an hour, easily.

And I know that I kept saying that a lot of the hardparts are not available aftermarket, and that's true. But you can get many of these parts from cores (junkyard starters) if you need them for a lot less than a new starter.

And the most important thing to remember:
Most discarded starters have nothing wrong with them. Most of them just need brushes or bushings.

And even if you need bushings and a brushrack, you can have a completely rebuilt (yes, when you go to a parts store and buy a starter, all you are getting is new brushes, new bearings, and a new solenoid. Everthing else is re-used, with the occasional exception of the drive)--

anyway, nine times out of ten, you can completely rebuild your bike starter for under twenty bucks. Run to the dealer and price one.

http://rebel250.com/rebelforum/viewtopic.php?t=3838

Folks,

I just finished rebuilding a Rebel starter.

It was kindly donated by Jack as a completely burned up and useless unit. By way of thanking him, when I get the final parts I need, I intend to ship him back the completely rebuilt unit.

I did this in order to test the practicality of the general starter walk-through above.

Sadly, it is inaccurate. The Rebel starter is set up drastically different.

Sorry folks, but while the above post gives a great idea of general principles, it isn't going to help much with the starter on your Reb if you aren't already reasonably familar with the process.

I'll do better later. Right now I have to run.

_________________

Duke
"Skills must be Learned"
------ Herb Christian


"Ask your doctor if medical advice from a television commercial is right for _you_."


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 Post subject: Re: not ready yet ... but working on it
PostPosted: Thu May 26, 2005 7:45 pm 
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Forum Administrator

Joined: Jul 25, 2003
Motorcycle: 98 Valkyrie
Rebel: 250
Country: USA
State/Province: GA
City: Vidalia
Seat Removal:

This works for both the Classic and the contemporary 250 Rebels. It most likely works the same for the 450 Rebels as well, but I haven't seen any confirmation. If you have a 450, it will be pretty easy to verify, however.

Right at the back of the pillion, behind the tail lamp, there are two chrome screws. They are, if memory serves, eight millimeters. Remove these two screws. Once these screws are removed, pull the pillion up and back (it must be worked out from beneath the little leather stap that runs across it) until it is clear of the bike. Take care not to scratch the fender or the tail light.

Once the pillion pad is removed, two more screws are exposed. These screws are on the rear of the pilot's seat and fasten it in place. Remove these two screws. As with the pillion pad, tug the seat up and back to clear it from the bike.

Look at the front of the seat pan for the pilot's seat. There is a tongue made to the front of it. This tongue fits into a slot to secure the front of the seat. When you reassemble the bike, make sure that this tongue is positioned correctly.

To replace the seats, simply reverse the process, making sure that the tongue of the pilot's seat pad is properly secured in the mounting slot.

_________________

Duke
"Skills must be Learned"
------ Herb Christian


"Ask your doctor if medical advice from a television commercial is right for _you_."


Last edited by Duke on Wed May 14, 2008 3:38 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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 Post subject: Re: not ready yet ... but working on it
PostPosted: Fri Jun 10, 2005 12:56 am 
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Joined: Jul 25, 2003
Duke wrote:
All of this is great advice.

I thought I'd point out that Ted (Old Road Dog) and a few others advocate various sealant products that go into your uninflated tube to help seal small puncture before you loose air pressure.

And Brent's suggestion is a long-standing modification for people who ride primarily long-range. I myself have one of those little pumps (gutted to minimize the size) hardwired into my electrical system so that I can just toggle it on and off. I even put a high-end pressure gauge inline so that I didn't have to worry about keeping track of a tire gauge, or worry about its accuracy (the cheapies are famous for being off as much as eighteen percent! :shock:).

That being said, I figured I'd toss this out as well. Actually, I've posted it a couple of times before, but can't seem to find either post right now. So here it is, the abridged version:

Changing a tire is no big deal. It's part of normal bike maintenance. But doing it beside the road adds a great deal to the challenge, particularly if you don't have a good friend and a highstand.

A roadside change on the Rebel is much like that on a dirtbike track.

Very briefly, it is:

Get the bike to some grass or pebble-free dirt if at all possible. Study the axles. When you pull the axle bolt out, which way does it need to come out? For the rest of this discussion, this will be the 'up' side, defaulting the other to the 'down' side.

Remove your luggage from the bike. Close the petcock and remove the gas tank. (on a Rebel, this should not require removing the seat). Drain the carb(s). Remove the battery. Remove the windscreen, if it is large, as well as the turn signal stalks on the 'down' side of the bike. If you are riding a 'contemporary' Rebel, you may want to remove the plastic side cover from the down side as well.

Take all your softest gear and make a nice resting place for your Rebel. Guys, you have the advantage here, as even without gear you can still strip off a good bit of clothing without getting in too much trouble! :shock: Save at least a T-shirt to go where the wheel is coming off!

With the bike on the sidestand, go ahead and make all your normal preparations to remove the tire, just as if you were working at home in your nice garage and the bike was on a jack.

Do everything that you can short of actually pulling out the axle bolt.

Once there is nothing left to do but pull the axle, carefully lay the bike over on the down side on your pile of gear. _QUICKLY_ remove the axle and wheel, estimate where the wheel mounts of the bike will be when you stand the bike back up. Place some sort of pad there, even if it is just a shirt. This is not essential, as standing on the dirt won't hurt your bike, really, but it will help to keep all kinds of debris and crud out of where you want to put the axle.

Note that I said _quickly_! There is still oil in the crankcase. Your trying your best to keep it there, and not give it the time it needs to seep into your cylinders. As soon as the wheel is clear of the bike, stand it back up. No, the kickstand will most likely _not_ be able to hold the bike up, but odds are it can be steadied on level ground by itself, of by stuffing a thing or two (rolled up gear; a few sticks; whatever you've got) here and there under the bike.

Do your tire repair.

Lay the bike back on the mat of gear; set the wheel in place and pin it with the axle. Stand the bike back up as soon as possible. The kickstand should work again, by the way.

Go ahead and do your buttoning up: brakes, nuts, bolts, whatever you had to do.

If you didn't close the carb after you drained it (and you really should have), do so now. Replace the battery and tank (turn the petcock back on :laughing:) Replace the stalks, shield, side cover, luggage, etc.

Hit the road.


Yes, it sounds like a lot. But anyone with even casual wrench skills can do it in under two hours, varying on how long it takes to break the tire from the rim and get it back.


And now here's the great news! The toolkit that came with your bike has all the tools that you will need to do all of this, with the possible exception of any screen and luggage that you add. So when you add on things like this, make sure that you have a tool or two to handle this added to your pack.

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 Post subject: Re: not ready yet ... but working on it
PostPosted: Wed Jun 29, 2005 9:08 pm 
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Joined: Jul 25, 2003
Motorcycle: 98 Valkyrie
Rebel: 250
Country: USA
State/Province: GA
City: Vidalia
From a thread on the subject:

http://rebel250.com/rebelforum/viewtopic.php?t=3071

Replacing the dash panel (speedo bracket) and changing the indicator lights:

the thread linked to above wrote:
I purchased my 2000 Rebel used and the speedmeter bracket was bent slightly when I purchased it, I have just purchased a replacement bracket from Honda and plan on installing it during the winter. Has anyone ever done this before? I just want to make sure I don't make any mistakes when installing it.


---------------------------------


You really can't mess it up.

There are two machine screws that hold it on, and the lights and gauge are self-explanatory.

Good luck.


-----------------------------------------


I am finally getting to replacing the bracket, my only other question is whether there is any trick to taking the neutral light, turn signal light, etc. off as there appears to be a metal clip behind the lights and I don't want to damage it.


-----------------------------------------


It's insanely simple, actually.

The speedo is self-explanatory, so I'm guessing you want some tips on the indicator lights.

Here you go:

gently (you can often do this with your fingernails) pry up around the chrome bezels of the indicator lights. The bezel and lens assembly will pop right out.

Once it pops out, the rest of the 'fixture' is held in place with a rubber boot/grommet thingy. Push it back through the bracket.

Push it up into your new bracket.

Hold the rubber thingy in place (so that you don't accidentally push it back through the bracket) and gently work the bezel and lens back into the boot.

The bezel forces pressure against the bracket itself, and that's all that holds the indicator lights in place. Very simple. In fact, it's one of the simplest designs I've ever run across.

Oh, and this might be a good time to make a swap,if you have any lights burned out.

Have fun with it.
________________

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Duke
"Skills must be Learned"
------ Herb Christian


"Ask your doctor if medical advice from a television commercial is right for _you_."


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 Post subject: Re: not ready yet ... but working on it
PostPosted: Wed Jul 13, 2005 11:58 am 
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Image

http://www.angelfire.com/rebellion2/millenniumrebel/Rebel250projects.html

Image

Image

http://forum.motorcycle-usa.com/attach. ... Lrebel.jpg

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 Post subject: Re: not ready yet ... but working on it
PostPosted: Thu Sep 29, 2005 8:47 am 
Offline

Joined: Jul 25, 2003
===== ========================= =====Image
Scott58 wrote:
cussed MR. Sometimes I'd swear your brain is actually plugged into the internet. Thanks dude.


http://rebel250.com/rebelforum/view ... 5&start=15
Chopdoc wrote:
I think it is clear that you have a NIC hardwired to your cerebrum and plugged into a high speed cable modem.


http://rebel250.com/rebelforum/view ... 5&start=10
Chopdoc wrote:
My Gawd M.R., you are everywhere!

Chopdoc wrote:
I have a four PCs on the home LAN plus three wireless laptops and a wireless PDA, and there is no way I could keep up with you.

I think you are superhuman, must have eight PCs and eight pairs of arms, all on wireless carried around in a wheelbarrow. :shock:

You are my hero! :shock:

Chopdoc wrote:
I get around the internet pretty well and (trying not to brag) have a pretty darn good memory. But I am still somehow far behind you.

I think you have a real talent for bringing things together and many people benefit from it. If there were a prize or award for such a thing you would have my vote.


Image

===========================================


dalepray wrote:
Duke...
..... I encourage anyone to copy and paste some of the most helpful posts and wisdom from the old forum into a new thread on the new forum. Duke, you posted some great stuff there. I would love to see a best of Duke, Fernando, BA, Herb and many other poster's "Best of" compilation or thread.

BA...
..... I know where your coming from ... I have had many comments sent to me personally and on the board commenting that it was one of the reasons they kept coming back for more. ..... Thanks for your support and all of your great resources.

Herb... With some trial and error and consulting the FAQ at the top of the page I am sure you will get up to speed n short order. It is not critical to use all the bells and whistles. Good old fasioned TEXT and horse sense still rules.
The thought crossed my mind that a FAQ thread in the "Rebel FAQ" category with the topic of "Riding a Rebel with a Physical Challange" would be very useful and helpful to a segment of the Rebel community. I can't think of anyone better to get it started. At some point when we have enough FAQ material in there I will clean out the mispostings from that section and lock down the category to keep it uncluttered and focused on frequently asked questions and answers.

Later,
Dale


Duke wrote:
Dude, you are really talking to the wrong guy when it comes to finding stuff on the net.

In my own experience, no one-- and I mean _no one_ !-- can top BA for finding the most arcane and bizzare bits of info.

However, I will do what I can to scarf a few discussions out of the old forum, perhaps tomorrow evening (company coming tonight).

heh heh heh--

Thanks for the vote of confidence, oh great and wizened Dragon ;)


Duke wrote:
[This one was from BA; note the address he gave for follow up info. I'm telling you, he is your guy for finding neat tidbits of info!-- Duke]

Dm of Md wrote:
" YES!! Just the information I've been longing for!
Thanks BA!!!


[Okay, that one was just to confirm that BA is the guy you really wanted to talk to ;) ]

As far as links or anything like that, just do a search on the subject, or hope someone better at such things steps up to the plate.

Hope that helped some.


Digital Treesloth wrote:
MR,

Thanks for the update; woo hoo, there's even a forum for my Aero right there. :D


Duke wrote:
Hey, BA--

I haven't seen the one for rubber mounting the engine before; thanks.

Maybe you could put a link directly to your resource page in a signature line!

Millenniumrebel wrote:
been there - done that ..... it's already embedded in the sig PIC - click on it



joelitz wrote:
Thanks MR for all the mods.

OK so I copied (stole) your handlebar project, tank strap, and extra lights projects and now the one that I am having trouble with is the one I thought would be the easiest, the horn project..

Thanks.


supafly wrote:
thanks for the straight answers! :lol:


RebelChopper wrote:
I know I know, but It's like the old saying, "do unto others...." My consideration will be returned in-kind, and it already has 8) Thanks


forum colors set up thread wrote:
dalepray wrote:
Hi BA,
I think this one is darker. Hard to tell for sure I am on my laptop pc in bed just about ready to call it a nite.
If you can find a shade you like, let me know what the 6 digit hexidecimal code it is and we will try it out Tuesday.
Later,
Dale

Doc wrote:
BA, I usually agree with you, but are you fooling with my mind here? :?:

Red for UN-read posts? :shock:

Gimme a break, I'm getting old, and all this convoluted logic will get me hopelessly confused.

Doc

dalepray wrote:
The link and visited link colors have been reversed.
Hope this helps.
Later,
Dale

Duke wrote:
Thanks for the color change, Dale!

I didn't know it could be done, or I would have asked for it myself!

Thank you thank you thank you!


Duke wrote:
BA is right; there are a lot of folks who won't take the time to register, and therefore will not be able to participate fully in this site. Maybe some of these missing folks have decided that they'd prefer to lurk?

Not complaining, of course; we all know why you did it, and I think omst of us would rather see this group change than disappear; thanks for keeping it alive, Dale.

But BA was right-- you should have won some kind of an award afor the old layout.


Herb wrote:
BA
When you find one you like post a link, I also need to change mine and I know you will make a good choice...


Duke wrote:
Man!

How many oil threads did you dig up?!


Herb wrote:
BA
That was very infomative to any newbie that wants to change his own oil!!!!

Good job!!!!


Frank wrote:
BA - outstanding description. Thank you.


Anonymous wrote:
thanks!!


Santana wrote:
thanx


Rebel-Newbie wrote:
Thank you for all the help.
Your the greatest.

Rebel-Newbie


Rebel04 wrote:
Yes this is what I meant; thanks.


Duke wrote:
Ditto from me, Kid.


Anonymous wrote:
8)....think about what Dale and BA have said...


Ken wrote:
And that.....settles that.


Herb wrote:
True BA
Sad but True!!!


Anonymous wrote:
Yeah, ...


Ray wrote:
BA....way to go pard... :D

Ray
MRA Member


Ray wrote:
I agree with BA.

Ray
MRA Member


Geezy Rider wrote:
Thank's BA, they look sturdy enough and there is a lot to be said for the simplicity.


Daniel wrote:
Thanks Mill....

Daniel


Brian S wrote:
Thanks for trying to help MillenniumRebel.


Chopdoc wrote:
Thanks MR


smilingreen wrote:
MR
Thanks for the speedy response.


Chopdoc wrote:
Hey, MR

It has been a good while since I looked at that and I had forgotten about the birdseed! Just goes to reinforce what I say about checking out a used bike thoroughly after you get it. Funny stuff. I don't think I have ever come across anything so odd in a bike myself.


gusrip98 wrote:
Like BA said ...


Duke wrote:
Whoah!

cussed, but that's nice!


forkliftbobby wrote:
B.A.

Do you have a link on your site for that mod?? I would really like one and would love to see how you did it.

Thanks,
Bobby


forkliftbobby wrote:
Sounds good to me!
Thanks Very Much!

Bobby


forkliftbobby wrote:
Thanks for all the pictures and links BA!! I do enjoy your website very much. Keep up the good work!!


JKDJose wrote:
Thanks MR. For some reason you have all the magical links because I can't find them.

Thanks again.


tjobowa wrote:
MR has pulled some posts up from this board that I've looked hard to find (with no luck, I might add 8) ).

Tom O.


wheezeburnt wrote:
No kidding! Wouldn't surprise me to see MR pull up a post that first appeared in the Dead Sea Scrolls, and was cross-posted to our forum. That boy's a walkin' archive.


megan wrote:
MillenniumRebel is the most awesome, coolest person in the whole world!!!!
:)

MR.....I owe you a million THANK YOUs!

...and I have to say... I have bike envy! :oops: (Gorgeous ride you have there!)

Thanks so much again and if there is ever anything I can do for you...you just let me know! (My offer still stands on a nice winter scarf made from Alpaca wool...just let me know the colors and it's yours!)
:)
One very happy rider,
~Megan



===========================================

http://rebel250.com/rebelforum/view ... 9&start=20
Duke wrote:
I mentioned doing this before,

but just so you understand where I am coming from, let me give you a recap:

Since I have been doing this extremely thankless volunteer work, I have garnered equally praise and complaint. Being who I am, I appreciate both for what they are, and no more than that. I assign equal value to viewpoints on both sides, and do what I can to work with what is valid.

So here it is, compiled over the last several months; my list of people that I have been repeatedly accused of showing favoritism for:

GearJammer
Uneasy Rider
Rojo
MillenniumRebel
tjobowa
Zekkye
Wheezeburnt
Chopper_Town_Customs_LLC
Phil_RC_1
hercman
RebelVixen
Old Road Dog
fishstick
Fugaziface
rebelsox
ShadowShack
Digital Treesloth
smunderdog
HansFischer
pa Daniel
Joe Kewl
Demenshea
Forkliftbobby
metalslugg
PastorPhil
glw


Oops.

I meant to only post the top 25; that is, the 25 that I am most often accused of giving 'prefferential treatment.' There is a total of 126 members that I have been accused of giving prefferential treatment to. These are the top 26 (my miscount; sorry).

And there is also a list of the "most appreciated" people-- forty-seven called by name as "invaluable resources" to this board.

And with the exception of (forgive me; this is not a representation of anyone's abilities or social standing. It is merely a compilation of statistics that I bothered keeping up with in my on-going attempts to make this forum the best place that I can) Fugaziface, fishstick, and Hans Fischer, all-- yes, _all_ the above names are on that list.

Here's another interesting tidbit. I routinely get PMs and e-mails complaining about other members of the forum, and with repeated complaints about members comes, eventually, a request, call, or suggestion to ban the particular offending member.

Now look at that list again-- the people to whom I have been accused numerous times of showing favoritism. The people who have each been individually at one time or other singled out to me as 'the most valuable resource on this forum-- look at it again, and study it.

I also keep-- out of morbid curiousity partly, and partly out of genuine concern: there is a need to identify why someone would think that someone else is a recurring problem-- a list of all the people who have been singled out for requests of bannishment. Currently, there are seventy-seven people on that list.

Like I said, look at that list up above.

With the exceptions of Rojo, tjobowa, pa Daniel, pastorphil, and glw, _every single person on that list_ has been singled out for banning by at least one other member of this board. Most have been hit more than once.

For what it's worth, I'm number one on this list of people who need to go. Apparently a number of people don't like the way I 'come off' when I am trying to help.

Gear, you are number two, second only to me.
After you is Fugaziface, then comes Phil_RC_1.

Finishing out the top five, in order, are George (formerly RebelRidin, who oddly enough never had any complaints under that name, and all of his complaints are within the past week. There have just been a lot of them) and then Demenshea.

First, let me tell everyone I have called by name:
You are _not_ being banned. Why? Because individually or collectively, you have not broken any rules, and you have not really done anything--- at one point or another, someone got his nose out of joint about something you said-- usually a total mis-understanding, and it has been let go. Do _not_ take it personally. If it weren't for one person here pushing so cussed hard to keep public issues that I am no longer putting up with, I wouldn't have put any of this out to the forum; believe me. You are all welcome.

And for those who have buzzed me with suggestions to ban one or another member, I would like to point out that I have yet to recieve a suggestion for banishment from any member who was not himself the subject of one from another member. So before you get out of sorts the next time, you might want to think about that.

And because you are wondering:

MR is number seven on the "should be banned" list. He is also number three on the list of "greatest resources," right behind Jeff Schenkle and glw. I am afraid that I didn't even qualify for that list; fortunately, I don't come here for that. I come here to help and to share.

And Howard, because I know you are wondering, you are 'lucky' number twenty-two on the "ban this member" poll. Heh heh heh heh-- if there's one Top Ten list to miss, I'd have to say that you missed the right one!

Again, no one is being banned, and I have already said why. At least, not yet.

Like I said, I have put a lot of time into deciding whether or not to make this info public, and more than likely I will live to regret it.

Keep in mind that it is just numbers, and mostly stuff said in fits of pique. It really ain't worth worrying about.

But it should give pause to think.

_________________
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Last edited by MillenniumRebel on Sat Oct 01, 2005 4:03 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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 Post subject: Re: not ready yet ... but working on it
PostPosted: Thu Sep 29, 2005 9:09 am 
Offline

Joined: Jul 25, 2003
MillenniumRebel wrote:
prince's personal purple rain bike (not the stunt double bikes) was a custom hondamatic 400

Image

dug up the info for fernando - he wants to duplicate it ....
http://www.surfmaine.com/cgi-bin/webbbs_files/config.pl?read=3194
Fernando wrote:
Date: Tuesday, 7 May 2002, at 10:46 a.m.

Hey, here is an off topic one for you. I am very interested in reproducing the bike Prince rode in Purple Rain. OK stop laughing. I really want to do it. Trouble is I am having trouble finding info. The best I have done is to find out is was a Honda 500 of some sort (and I do not know if that is correct). The only pictures I can find are not so great (album cover). I would love some good photos, the year, make, and model. Also, any ID on the accessories (is that a Windjammer fairing?) would be great. Thanks, and yes....I am crazy.

Adam wrote:
Date: Tuesday, 7 May 2002, at 12:25 p.m.
In Response To: I need some help (Fernando)

Darn I saw Prince at the nightclub I work at just the other night, I could have asked him! That would be pretty funny.

1963gt wrote:
Date: Tuesday, 7 May 2002, at 4:49 p.m.
In Response To: Re: I need some help (Adam)

yes it would be neat. it was a windjammer fairing. i think you are also right on it being a honda 500 had a heck of a sissy bar. i will go rent movie and see if i can get more info.... grt

BABailey wrote:
Date: Tuesday, 7 May 2002, at 5:40 p.m.
In Response To: Re: I need some help (1963gt)

this is a stumper - been spending hours searching - LOTS of 'mention' of it but no pics or specs

Fernando wrote:
Date: Tuesday, 7 May 2002, at 5:52 p.m.
In Response To: Re: I need some help (BABailey)

Yup, lots of mention, but in the context of the places I find it mentioned there is no real interest in the bike. Except for some mention of the stunt bike that was used off road. I saw mention of it being on display, if I can find out where it might be possible to get pictures. I need to look at a DVD and try to save some stills, but I don't know how to do that and I don't have DVD on my computer anyway. Thanks for the interest, my search goes on, let me know if you see anything.

Lunatic wrote:
Date: Tuesday, 7 May 2002, at 6:25 p.m.
In Response To: Re: I need some help (Fernando)

get ahold of sportwheels in minneapolis minnesota. they have the bike there.

BABailey wrote:
Date: Tuesday, 7 May 2002, at 6:50 p.m.
In Response To: Re: I need some help (Lunatic)

searched - found their site ....

http://www.sportwheel.com/index.html

BABailey wrote:
Date: Tuesday, 7 May 2002, at 6:00 p.m.
Re: Afterthoughts

maybe find a couple prince fan club forums and post a question for the resident geeks there ... or a motorcycle board ... email honda - email prince - email the movie studio ... seems to me there SHOULD be a centralized site for "Motorcycles in the movies" for this exact kind of interest etc...

maybe find the motorcycle magazines online indexes and check if it was featured in an article way back when ??

BABailey wrote:
Date: Tuesday, 7 May 2002, at 6:24 p.m.
In Response To: ... after thoughts (BABailey)

i posted this link at several chopper boards ...

http://www.cruisebikes.net/showthread.p ... readid=725

http://www.network54.com/Hide/Forum/mes ... 1020819884

http://pub33.ezboard.com/fhondachopperf ... 1653.topic

http://pub33.ezboard.com/fhondachopperf ... =580.topic

http://pub36.ezboard.com/fhonda35040050 ... ID=8.topic

..... maybe someone will know something

Tom Summers wrote:
Date: Tuesday, 7 May 2002, at 6:34 p.m.
In Response To: I need some help (Fernando)

Someone posted this on the Hondachopper board. I painted the purple rain bikes and helped with the redo. I also rebuilt it and repainted the Grafiti Bridge bikes. What do you need to know.??

Fernando wrote:
Date: Tuesday, 7 May 2002, at 7:47 p.m.
In Response To: Re: I need some help (Tom Summers)

I am interested in reproducing the Purple Rain bike, the one on the album cover. I understand this is your work, I hope you don't mind. I am trying to find out the year, make, and model, as well as some details about the accessories like the fairing, sissy bar, etc. It would be nice to find some decent pictures too. This is for my own personal project and nothing more. I was not even sure if the bike was still around and am glad to hear it was saved. Can you give me any info?

Tom Summers wrote:
Date: Tuesday, 7 May 2002, at 9:04 p.m.
In Response To: I need some help (Fernando)

I did the bike back in 1984. It is a Honda 400 automatic. I believe the year to be about 1980 or so. It was bought along with two stunt bikes that weren't autos brand new from a dealer as leftover models. The automatic had its Comstar wheels converted to spokes to resemble the stunt bikes. The fairng is a brand name Kutter. I bought them from a company in Iowa I believe named the Kutter company. The three seats are one off,with hot pink velour inserts custom made in Drag Specialties upholstery deaptment. The sissy bar was a standard Drag spec. item. The handlebars are the 6 bend variety. As for the bikes today...one of the stunt bikes remains purple and is on display at Paisley Park Studios in Chanhassen, MN. I redid Princes bike along with the thrashed stunt bike in black and gold for the movie Grafiti Bridge in about 1990. As for Sport Wheels having any of the bikes..doubtful...but any thing is possible. What they do have is a replica Kutter fairing that I sold them years back. They tell everyone that its off Princes bike.......wrong. Any other questions ?? I'd be more than happy to answer.....Tom.

=====

I WENT BACK AND CHECKED MY RECORDS TO BE SURE.
ITS ACTUALLY A 1981 HONDA 400A.

BABailey wrote:
Date: Tuesday, 7 May 2002, at 7:50 p.m.
In Response To: Thanks (Fernando)

i'm feeling real proud of myself LOL

tried the chopper foums on an off chance and BINGO ....

Fernando wrote:
Date: Wednesday, 8 May 2002, at 4:11 a.m.
In Response To: i'm feeling real proud of myself LOL (BABailey)

You should be proud. I know that board and didn't think to try it. I know some of these guys from other boards too and they are a great crowd. You might recall I have a CB 750 too, so the GOTF are my kind of people. Thanks again for your very helpful efforts.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Jul 04, 2007 1:42 am 
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Joined: Jul 25, 2003
A great basic explaination of V-twin Powerplant Physics 101 for understanding engine performance



========================


also ... Rebel specs from a UK review

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Mar 21, 2008 12:10 am 
Offline

Joined: Jul 14, 2007
Country: USA
State/Province: PA
City: Penn Hills
a sincere thanks for your hard work MR

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Apr 22, 2008 6:24 am 
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Joined: Jul 25, 2003
you're welcome

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