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 Post subject: Heavy Duty Rebel Battery
PostPosted: Thu Aug 26, 2010 7:27 pm 
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Joined: Jun 18, 2009
Motorcycle: 1999 Rebel CMX
Rebel: 250
Country: USA
State/Province: FL
City: Summerfield
Long Term Tracking of Heavy Duty Rebel Battery.

The 4 year old Battery in my Rebel is going south fast. I found a heavy duty replacement while searching on the Internet.

Stock Battery is rated at 85 CCA (Cold Cranking Amps).
Replacement Battery is rated at 140 CCA. Made in China.
Specs on Battery : Power Source WP7L-B Sealed AGM - 12 Volt - 140 CCA - 7 AH

After receiving the Battery, I charged it for 48 Hrs with my Battery Tender. Let Battery set idle for 24 Hrs.

Visited the Cadillac Dealership where I use to work. Used their Battery Tester to check the new Battery. It displayed 13.6 Volts and 181 CCA.

Battery to be installed on 8/27/2010. Mileage approx 30,400 miles.

Link to Battery.
http://www.ebatteriestogo.com/landing_p ... UB7L-B.htm

Link to Battery Tester.
http://www.toolsource.com/battery-teste ... 9351l7kms5

_________________
If you're Waiting on me, you're Late.



1999 Honda Rebel VQR234se
. . . . . 43,000+ Miles . . . . . .


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Aug 26, 2010 8:41 pm 
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Joined: Jul 25, 2003
Motorcycle: 98 Valkyrie
Rebel: 250
Country: USA
State/Province: GA
City: Vidalia
Most folks who have tried the AGM batteries seem to be very pleased with them. I expect you'll be similarly satisfied.

_________________

Duke
"Skills must be Learned"
------ Herb Christian


"Ask your doctor if medical advice from a television commercial is right for _you_."


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 Post subject: Re: Heavy Duty Rebel Battery
PostPosted: Tue Sep 13, 2011 9:10 pm 
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Joined: Jun 18, 2009
Motorcycle: 1999 Rebel CMX
Rebel: 250
Country: USA
State/Province: FL
City: Summerfield
After a year and 6,000+ miles, Battery is within 1% of the installed specs.

_________________
If you're Waiting on me, you're Late.



1999 Honda Rebel VQR234se
. . . . . 43,000+ Miles . . . . . .


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 Post subject: Re: Heavy Duty Rebel Battery
PostPosted: Wed Sep 14, 2011 3:09 pm 
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Best Loser!

Joined: Aug 16, 2005
Motorcycle: 08 Versys, 97 C-10, 79 KZ650
Rebel: 250
Country: USA
State/Province: NC
City: Newport
I have AGM's in the Concours and Versys (came stock). Have never had a minutes trouble with either one.

Dan

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 Post subject: Re: Heavy Duty Rebel Battery
PostPosted: Sun Sep 13, 2015 11:22 pm 
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Joined: Jun 18, 2009
Motorcycle: 1999 Rebel CMX
Rebel: 250
Country: USA
State/Province: FL
City: Summerfield
The replacement battery, after being in service for 5 years. Checks within 1%, of Installed Values.

_________________
If you're Waiting on me, you're Late.



1999 Honda Rebel VQR234se
. . . . . 43,000+ Miles . . . . . .


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 Post subject: Re: Heavy Duty Rebel Battery
PostPosted: Mon Sep 14, 2015 8:44 pm 
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Joined: Aug 9, 2010
Country: USA
State/Province: OH
City: Creston
I'm not trying to discredit this battery, but my OEM battery lasted 6 years, and only because I left the key switch on overnight by accident that the battery got ruined. It even sat for months during the winter without use or battery tender. More time is needed for this battery evaluation.

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'07 Rebel 250
'00 Rebel 250
'86 Rebel 450


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 Post subject: Re: Heavy Duty Rebel Battery
PostPosted: Mon Sep 14, 2015 9:18 pm 
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Joined: Jul 25, 2003
Motorcycle: 98 Valkyrie
Rebel: 250
Country: USA
State/Province: GA
City: Vidalia
My friend, you're battery was already ruined. If it was good, it would have taken a charge even from completely dead.

Fact is batteries wear out, just like anything else. We don't think about it that way because we tend to evaluate them in a more binary fashion: Did the bike start? Yes? No?

Yes is good; no is bad.

It's not like that. A battery should (and does) hold _far_ more electricity than is needed to start a bike, even on a cold day. At least, a _good_ battery does. It's also capable of taking a full charge and storing it for, believe it or not, three months or so without depreciable loss, assuming no draws are placed upon it.

Because they can-- and do-- hold all this extra power, we lose track of the idea that there is "extra" power there: we only care that it starts the bike.

As batteries age, they become more reluctant in their duties: they develop resistance. Resistance works both ways: in addition to working harder to give us the output that we ask for (resulting in actually having to use _more_ of their own reserves to do the same job because the resistance must be overcome), they also become resistant to taking a charge, meaning that the charging system must work harder and longer to put a charge back into the battery.

But we tend not to notice this because-- hey! The bike started, so the battery is okay, right?

They also get to a point where they won't take a full charge. They'll take enough to start the bike (even though that is now much more than it once was), but little or even no more. It's not rare to find one that can be charged nearly to full, but it can no longer put out full demand. It might test proper voltage (or not), but it can't pass enough amperage at one time to meet specs. But again: the bike may start, so on our typical pass/fail evaluation, it's a pass.

For the most part, we don't even _think_ about batteries until the bike doesn't start. By then, it's been too out of spec for too long, and it won't even pass the binary test.

Another issue-- as your posts seems to allude to-- is that they reach a point where they simply stop _holding_ a charge. This is a combination (usually) of sulfation of the plates (the primary cause of resistance) and the acid becoming steadily weaker. It is the action of the acid against the plates: eating away at them and re-depositing upon them-- that allows for storage and retrieval of electricity-- at least, in a typical lead/acid battery. I have no firm grasp of the witchcraft that goes on in gel cells and have only a conceptual understanding of AGM batteries.

As the plates sulfate, they are more difficult to break down and rebuild. As the acid weakens, it has a harder time breaking down and rebuilding the plates. These two negatives reinforce each other, over and over, until one day the bike won't start.


Unfortunately, it's not really that simple. I know-- most people don't believe this-- even when I had the DC electrical shop, most of our customers didn't believe it either-- most figured it was some claptrap to make a sale. Ironically, it was the other way around. :roll: The fact is that most damage to charging systems (rectifiers in particular, cars and bikes) is caused slowly, by extended use of batteries that are well out of spec. The alternator works longer and hotter to do its job, and it doesn't have any way to judge the battery: it's counting on you. But the bike starts, so it's good.

Starter damage is similarly caused. Those things are monstrous consumers_ of electrons, and-- much like alternators-- can work for extended periods of time on lower-than-optimum voltage or amperage or both. But it's not good for them. That's what cooks the armature windings and the roasts commutators. Most people think it's extended run-time on the starter. Sure, that can, if done to the extreme, cause damage. But weak batteries cause far more damage. Like high blood pressure, though, you can't see it right away. It takes enough time that when failure finally happens, you don't even associate it with the actual cause.

The majority of our rebuilds on starters _and_ alternators could have been avoided simply by routinely testing the battery to see if it was within specifications. If it's not, chunk it.

My professional recommendation, even on the over-hyped five-year batteries-- was to replace a battery in a car or truck every three years; replace a battery in a bike every two years. My personal recommendation is replace them both every two years _unless_ you're running a battery well over-rated for your application, in which case replace it as soon as it gets on the lower specifications for your factory-recommended battery.

I cut the fender well out of the Leviathan and installed a monstrous battery for just that reason. Five years now, and still going strong. It doesn't meet its own specifications anymore, but it's still well above the specs for the battery GM installed in it. ;)

_________________

Duke
"Skills must be Learned"
------ Herb Christian


"Ask your doctor if medical advice from a television commercial is right for _you_."


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