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 Post subject: Bob's Travelogue
PostPosted: Thu Nov 20, 2008 9:43 pm 
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Joined: Jul 25, 2003
Motorcycle: 98 Valkyrie
Rebel: 250
Country: USA
State/Province: GA
City: Vidalia
November 20, 2008.

I arrived in Vidalia today, stuffed in a mylar sack, with almost no oxygen left in my tanks. I was rescued some hours after sundown, and roused with the smell of cabbage and sausage. It's funny. I thought there'd be onions.

It's been a long, dark, bumpy haul. I hope to get about and see the sight (singular, I have to assume, given the area) this weekend, maybe get some shots of the locale.

For now though, I've already had to contend with major surgery (twice-- an removal and a re-implant. My neck is stiff, as if someone jammed a book in it), a battle with two children and an obese housecat. I think I've done enough for one evening.

I'll post back when I am again able. For now; good night.

_________________

Duke
"Skills must be Learned"
------ Herb Christian


"Ask your doctor if medical advice from a television commercial is right for _you_."


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PostPosted: Sat Nov 22, 2008 6:29 pm 
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Joined: Jul 25, 2003
Motorcycle: 98 Valkyrie
Rebel: 250
Country: USA
State/Province: GA
City: Vidalia
It was a slow starting sort of day, this day to which I woke. My host had told me that there would be precious little sight-seeing today, as he was bound to run countless errands this day. Having endured a coffee run with him last night at twenty-three degrees ( we had intended to get a picture for the cold-weather thread, but neither of us remembered our cameras), I was more than willing to sleep in while he busied himself.

He was actually busy far longer than either of us expected, what with him being the only person in the house not afflicted with the flu. However, he did return about mid-afternoon to take a small meal and check on the children. He allowed as how, even though there was no time for any actual sight-seeing, I was more than welcome to come on the last round of errands, if only to see something other than the house. I agreed, of course. I was ready to get out and see something.


After a pre-flight once over by his Master Technician,





my host pronounced us road-ready.

I was at a bit of a loss. One of the things he did was change from one set of gear into a heavier set of gear. When I inquired, he replied simply that "we'll be out past sundown. This time of year, you don't want to be out past sundown without some good heavy stuff on." It seems sundown is when the freezing starts. Odd. I'd always thought of the south as a warm and sunny place all year round. Though, truth be told, my thoughts of the south were, like most other outsiders, colored with images of farms and plantations and beaches and other touristy things. I'd never given much time at all to wondering about winter nights. Interesting.

I chuckled to myself as he dressed. As a bear, I have not only all the gear I'll ever need, but gear such as no human biker could ever have.


I went ahead and started the bike while he finished getting his gloves on.




In no time at all, we were rolling through the city of Vidalia.



Yes; that's more or less what it looks like. That's not actually in the city limits, but I chose it to illustrate a point. I had heard from my friend Paul prior to this trip that my host had commented on having extensive dirt riding experience. I didn't take that to mean anything, and so I didn't wonder about it.

But then I got to Vidalia. There _are_ paved roads here. All the highways. If it's a highway, with an official highway number and all the formalities, then it's paved, at least in places.

But if it _isn't_ a highway:


( I was _so_ glad I couldn't see the speedometer here. Pictures do no justice to how tight this curve is, or that it's followed with a reverse curve that slopes to the outside. And it's all sand and loose gravel. Horrifying)

then it isn't paved.

Yes; I'm serious. I know how hard that is to believe; I wouldn't have either. So I took a few more snaps about town.





There more in the same vein-- simply point and shoots as we flew through town, but I wanted to include those for the details. See the signs? The little green ones? The _street_ sign?! Those fluffy sand pathways are the roads once you get off the highways! I never would have believed people to live like this within the city limits.

I mean really--

how many towns boast hardwood swamps in their midsts?







Of course, no trip to Onion City is complete without stopping to see at least one of the onion fields. Duke (my host) convinced me that there were no onion fields; that onions were actually manufactured here:



He had me going until his straight face cracked, and he did finally agree to work one or more of his errands so that it might include passing an onion field. I wanted to see the biggest, prettiest, most spectacular one available, of course, but Duke insisted that one looked about like another, so we simply headed for the closest. So here are a couple of some of the McLain Farms onion fields:



If you look very closely, you can see the little green sprouts starting out of the ground. I was surprised that they would grow fast enough to be harvested, but it turns out that they won't. They grow very slowly, and in the same part of the world that can see three corn harvests and two soybean harvests in a single summer, these sweet onions will not be harvest until mid summer, and the next crop will go in the ground in the early fall. Apparently sitting out here growing through the freezing months is somehow important. I didn't get many more details, because -- well, it's just conversation, and bears don't eat onions.







Still, it was interesting to see, if only for a moment. Duke apologized, but I reassured him that I was well aware these were incidental shots to running errands. Perhaps tomorrow might lend us more time to find something worth immortalizing.

As the pictures indicate, we were well into sunset, and only then did it occur to Duke that we were likely an hour from the house and he was still using his lightweight gloves. We climbed back aboard the bike (we had selected the little Rebel in honor of the board supporting my trip) and raced into town.

I learned something as the sun continued to dip. I learned that bears are built for cold weather. Cold weather at walking speed! As we ran wide-open back toward civilization and dirt roads (sounds odd, doesn't it?), I was freezing, feeling every bit of that cold whipping through my fur.

We hit the city limits again and wheeled in for a chance to thaw out his frozen knuckles and my everything else.

Coffee it was; a cup for him, and bowl, suitable for bathing, for myself. At least, that was the order.



They got it wrong. A cup too small to bathe in, and too heavy to pick up. And me without a straw...

_________________

Duke
"Skills must be Learned"
------ Herb Christian


"Ask your doctor if medical advice from a television commercial is right for _you_."


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Nov 23, 2008 9:45 pm 
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Joined: Jul 25, 2003
Motorcycle: 98 Valkyrie
Rebel: 250
Country: USA
State/Province: GA
City: Vidalia
Well today we were able to get out and about a bit more; see the sights, as it were. Not as much as we had planned, as the sickness in Duke's house had taken a turn for the worse, but we were able to travel about within an hour or so of his house in a a couple of directions.

First, I wanted to really see this little town whose famous sweet onions travel all over the hemisphere. I was surprised at just how little there was to it. The "village," as it is, is really nothing more than three paved highways that happen to run parallel very closely to one another, and a dozen or so short paved roads that join them.

The village really _is_ surprisingly small. One pass and I saw everything:



























The movie theater was interesting. Honestly, if I hadn't seen it with my own eyes, I wouldn't have believe it either. I even asked to be in this shot, just so folks would believe it was current:



You may want to lay on your side to view that one.

Having seen all the sights of Vidalia, we took the first road out of town:



I had hope to get a shot or two of a "now leaving Vidalia" sign, but Duke assured me that the "Paved Road Ahead" signs pretty much meant the same thing. Shame that picture didn't come out, though. Too much sun reflecting back at us, I suppose. Such is life. Onward to the rest of the world I am so itching to see!

Our next stop was Alston. Not the most picturesque place in a conventional sense





But like my host, I found myself to really enjoy it. Honestly, where else would you find children riding ATVs down mainstreet and no one really notice anything odd about it?




A nice quite place, really. As you can see, "shopping" such as it was is a thing of the past here, but they did have this novel little park area:


(unfortunately, the best shot just happened to be the one of me bathing...)


(Woah, Mule! Woah! I always wanted to do that!)



I had always loved seeing children playing on those old cabooses that had been converted into little miniature jungle gyms. I was surprised to learn that this was _not_ such a playground, but was in fact the Alston Railroad Museum. This caboose was the only part of the museum, and it was "donated" by the rail company when a washed out track section left it stranded where it currently sits. But it has been left completely untouched, for those who have always wondered just what a caboose actually looked like.

Sadly, it has been left untouched by the cleaners as well, what with there being no budget for maintenance and even the repainting on this little train car is done entirely by volunteers at their own expense.

It's interesting, though. It's like a little camper in there.

There's a dining area: a seat and a table.



Again, it makes more sense if you lay on your side.

The table lets down to the wall (or folds up to cover the window) and the seat slides out to an approximation of a bunk if the need arises.

There is a genuine bunk area in that little 'bay window' section:


(Yes; I am well-aware that this shot is also sideways)

The couches (one on each side of the car) fold into chaises, or into bunks. And where else but the South could you leave a vintage wood-burning pot-bellied stove completely unguarded and have it remain unstolen and unsold to an antiquities dealer, I ask you?



And of course, if you're on the road for any length of time, there are other needs to address as well:



Again, not a tourist-y sort of thing, but interesting nonetheless.

And just uphill from the elevated fountain and caboose is this charming little footbridge with gazebo!




For those of you who didn't notice it in the pulled-back shot of the City of Alston, I'd like to focus in on the Post Office:



as presented by Coca-Cola.

The entire building was in such a state of disrepair I found it difficult to believe that the US Postal Service actually operated out of it. Duke assured me that it did not, and had not for several years now. When the roof collapsed a few years ago, the Post Office moved up the street



and into this lovely single-wide mobile home, where they have remained ever since.

The two-bedroom cottage next door to it is actually the recently-constructed City Hall. As soon as someone dies and his heirs register the land, they will have a record to keep on file. I believe there's an advent calender of sorts.

A quick bask in the sunshine and we were on the road again.



We were headed in the general direction of Hazelhurst, though we didn't expect to have time to get there. Our intention was to see the river if nothing else, but first, we had to pass through Uvalda.

And here it is, within walking distance of Alston, the fair city of Uvalda:



Seriously. That's it. That plaza and the little park in front of it is almost the entire 'city.' There is an auto parts store around the corner that can't be-- what? Oh; I'm sorry. A hardware and feed store that sells auto parts around the corner (thank you, Duke) out of sight, but this plaza is essentially the whole town. It's a one-stop shopping sort of affair, with groceries on one end, a restaurant somewhere in the middle, and City Hall on the far end. The only thing missing is the washeteria and police station, which we had parked in front of:



No, really-- that's the police station:



In all honesty, it seems a bit extravagant, as they do not actually have a police _man_. The car you see around the side, near the intersection, is empty. Completely empty. And it has been parked there, empty, long enough to make me wonder if it actually runs.

On the other side of the police station, where we had parked, a deputy sheriff takes advantage of the police "garage" to protect the interior of his car.



I assume that perhaps one day a week or so he doubles as the local law in exchange for this favor, but Duke wasn't certain if it was even that often.

While my norther upbringing led me to concern over the lack of constabulary, Duke assured me that they've never needed any. Most folks in these parts knew just what do with a body anyway.

Though they do seem to have a rivalry with neighboring Alston:



And while they're bridge has much more rustic appeal, the Alston footbridge is far more impressive. Duke tells me most folks from Vidalia make a special pilgrimage to see the Alston park when it's decorated for Christmas. Evidently the lights and the nativity scene are truly spectacular.

We hit the road again



(anyone else seeing a pattern to the way he travels?)

and began to discuss the relative poverty of this area. I was surprised by his answers to my questions, though. It seems that it's not a poverty, per se, but a general lack of enthusiasm for things material. Folks who have peace and quite don't need drown anything out with big stereos. Folks without streets don't have much use for billboards. Though it was with some embarrassment on behalf of his people that he admitted there was a cotton farmer locally who had just bought one of those European SUVs. Intrigued by the incongruity, I insisted that we swing around to see it.

I have to say,

I _was_ surprised:




At least there's no pretension here. These southern people full well understand the point of _utility_ in their Sport _UTLITLY_ Vehicles:



The cotton fields...

I was transfixed. I can't really explain it; the cotton had been long harvested, and there was nothing left but stems and stalks and dried bolls and the rain-beaten leavings of raw cotton missed by the machinery...

But there was something...

primal...

It stirred something in me.

It was as though something had been missing my whole life-- missing from inside me--- and I'd been brought face to face with it! As if without this cotton, I would never be complete...

I know; it sounds a bit dramatic, but for some reason, I felt that this cotton would somehow complete me, as if I had found the soul of teddy bears everywhere, lain out before me.

I climbed a stalk missed by the harvesters and mugged for the camera while Duke took some shots for me.


(grr! Arrgh! I am tough primordial teddy bear! Fear me! :rofl: )



We had to leave, but I couldn't leave empty handed. It would be like leaving Valhalla without quaffing ambrosia-- or even Light Meade. When Duke wasn't looking, I grabbed a bit of raw cotton-- stalk, boll, and all, and secured it with my cargo. I had to have this. I _had_ to. Please, if you find it before I get back to Paul, take great care of it. It's special to me.

We hit the road again, and eventually came to the first river, the Altamaha.

The drought, my guide explained, has been devastating. To make matters worse, the carpetbaggers in Atlanta have been damming up everything to quench the needs of all those gas station / car wash combos the transplanted folks can't seem to live without, and everyone down river is suffering.

He seemed bitter over the fact that saving a manmade recreational lake ranked higher to the governor of Altanta than did the loss of an entire way of life-- the entire industry of fishing that had made the Four Rivers area unique amongst most inland locations in North America.

I did have to admit, the river was low. There wasn't enough water there to fill even a fourth of the bed.



It might show better in a larger image, but there's a little tag on one of those trees. That tag is the low water mark. These trees are usually under water.

We actually rode on the river bed for a couple of miles before we came to a barrier that we didn't feel good about moving.



Those are cypress trees. That fat part of their trunks is usually completely submerged. The need a great deal of water to live. That water is washing cars and running fountains for the carpetbaggers instead. Good thing they like those wood-colored cardboard floors, because that's all that's going to be left at this rate. Though cardboard takes a lot of water to make, too. Thanks, Dalton, Georgia. Drink up. I can't wait till the E85 plant opens up. Seven gallons of irrevocably polluted water to make one gallon of fuel. Fuel with less power and less mileage than gas, with a higher cost of production and a greater rate of pollution, that will ultimately sell for two cents less. Nice. ;)

We continued on in the river bed, snapping pictures here and there:







While the rest of the world watches with bored disinterest the debates about the manmade lakes of Georgia and the importance of keeping them full, the rest of the state suffers the lack of any resolution.

This was our ingress to the river bed:



For those of you not familiar with what those things look like from that end, Duke hiked up the hill for a better shot.



That, readers, is a boat ramp. It's roughly four hundred feet long. Only the first thirty feet or so should be visible this time of year, and only a hundred or so during the dry season.

We, however, rode right down it



and parked on the bottom.



They are rather steep, as well. It turns out that if you ... uhm... if you stand at the top of the ramp and attempt to raise the level of the river.. uhm... biologically... it will make it to the end of the ramp before .. uhm.. before your reserves are exhausted. I tell you that not so much for the humor value, but so that you will understand just how much water is missing.

His maudlin mood having rubbed off on me, I prompted him to move on, and we again tore out through the woods at speeds that suggest either dirt roads are completely normal for him or that he should have his head examined!

A new sign since his last visit prompted him to pull over and examine it.



From my vantage point,



I found the humor long before he managed to hobble over to the bank and peer down.



I concur. That's a _terrible_ place to swim!

And if any of you are wondering just how much water is missing, this might help:



Those dots on the far side are houses and docks. They are a half mile or so across the river. The banks on that side are roughly twelve feet high. The houses are on stilts, as the river used to routinely overflow in heavy rain-- something else this area hasn't seen for quite some time.

I tried to explain that to Duke-- without rain, there just isn't water to replenish that which is used. It didn't help much; he has some wild theories about that, too. I opted to skip over it and asked about the next river.

And an hour or two later, we were there:



Not as many travel shots along this one. There was water in it! I had thought that the volume of water-- and the new boat ramp-- might cheer my companion, but then he pointed out that we had parked on the _old_ boat ramp. Seems the river _should_ be deep enough that we'd have to swim to get to where we were.


Having lost his heart to view the other rivers, we headed back for home.

I did have a second to snap this shot, for the non-believers:



What is this, you ask? What is the meaning of this photo of cows?

Well believe it or not, they are _coming home_! Yes; it's true! This field of cattle which we had passed not thirty minutes previously had been a scene of pastoral laziness, with cattle milling about, sleeping, eating, whatever struck their narrow little bovine fancies.

but this time-- the sun was at a particular angle, and the cattle just got up en masse and began walking off toward the barn, others walking up from over the hill and joining in. It was amazing! I was entranced, and Duke was laughing hysterically over my fascination.

oh well.

We didn't beat sundown this time, but at least we were prepared for it. And on the way in, we made a quick pass by the bank:



From the mid-fifties to 32 in just the few minutes it took for the sun to disappear over the horizon behind us. Amazing! Duke had told me that I couldn't appear in the photo due to the height of the sign, but that little red light-- that's me, keeping the bike running (and hugging the tailpipes!).



And that was it. That concluded my big visit to this part of the country. I can't wait to get started on the next leg of the journey!

I'm learning, all right. So far I've learned about paved roads. You have to be careful on a paved road. A bike'll get out from under you on pavement. You just can't trust them to behave the same once you get out of the dirt.

I've also learned the Seth McFarlane is a close-minded ignorant bigot.




Bob.

_________________

Duke
"Skills must be Learned"
------ Herb Christian


"Ask your doctor if medical advice from a television commercial is right for _you_."


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Jan 05, 2009 9:26 pm 
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Joined: Jul 25, 2003
Motorcycle: 98 Valkyrie
Rebel: 250
Country: USA
State/Province: GA
City: Vidalia
Well, I am on my way. After several weeks of layover (owing to the most bizarre series of circumstances and events I believe I've ever been privy to) I ended up staying much longer at Duke's place than I had really planned to stay anywhere.

I did have a grand time during the holidays, though, and honestly, I was almost sad to go. Then Howard and Howard began sizing me up as a comfy thing to sleep on, and suddenly all my regrets were behind me: I was chaffing at the bit to get moving.

I had intended to get more pictures-- at least the city limits signs of all the places I'd be passing through, but it was not to be. Just as we left, we encountered rain. Not a storm or such thing, but rain enough that I was hesitant to drag the camera out. In fact, it eventually got heavy enough that I slipped down from my perch and spent the bulk of the trip peeking out of the sheltered end of a saddlebag.

My unique vantage point gave me the feeling of 'sneaking' through a baker's dozen of rural towns, peeping out unseen upon a snapshot of daily life here and there. More than once I found myself watching the people in the trucks behind us while my mind wandered, recounting the things I've seen the past few weeks, and wondering what was yet to come.

A few cotton fields raced into my view, then lazily drifted away, over the horizon. An unusual warmth and a strange midday fog took hold (Duke later told me that we had been passing Plant Hatch, a nuclear power plant just outside of Baxley, and that the fog was normal there on muggy, rainy days). Baxley was interesting, at least from my perspective. The center of town was a frozen snapshot of city in the fifties, just starting to grow-- three story stone buildings, a growing shopping district, compressed to walking distances-- a city just beginning to urbanize.

Then the sixties hit, and nothing else happened. A beautiful, picturesque area with a six or seven block radius, surrounded by rambling tin buildings, collapsing structures, and sprawl.

Very shortly after passing the line of strip malls, a lumber mill shot past, and Baxley was already becoming a memory.

a long ride -- a long, straight ride that told me this area had only recently-- just in this generation-- given up farming in exchange for tract houses and subdivisions. It won't be too long, I think, before the entire world looks the same.

A few more small towns, and a few more large ones, and lots of time with my eyes and my thoughts---

then we were sitting outside the Cracker Barrel in Kingsland, Georgia-- three miles from the Florida line.

The timing was perfect: Just as we finished stretching our legs, Jack and Mrs. arrived.



Duke introduced me and we made my traveling arrangements.



After a bite to eat and a fun session of shooting the breeze,

a trade was made.

I don't mind saying, I felt rather awkward.



("We'd like to thank Paul Jack for this Award...")

Well, on to the next adventure, I suppose.

I can't wait! :mrgreen:

_________________

Duke
"Skills must be Learned"
------ Herb Christian


"Ask your doctor if medical advice from a television commercial is right for _you_."


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PostPosted: Mon Jan 12, 2009 5:47 pm 
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Joined: Mar 26, 2008
Motorcycle: 1986 450 rebel
Rebel: 450
Country: USA
State/Province: FL
City: Daytona Beach
After the few weeks I spent with Duke I was on my way into Florida land of sun and fun. I had a nice relaxing trip with mr and Mrs B were they took me in for the night and kept me safe and warm and showed the southern hospitality. the next morning I found out I was off on another adventure to meet with Libracowgirl. I got to meet her at a great place called Horses and Hounds, now most animals might be afraind of such large animals as a horse or be afraid they would be tracked by a hound but not me cause I knew I was safe I mean I'm a BEAR after all!. Well we had a great lunch and then it was off to libras homestead which is a nice coutry setting. I got to do alot of fun things out there I got to ride horses and bikes she even put me to work and taught me how to drive a tractor.
After spending a week with her it was back to Horse and hounds for another part of my journey. After a few hours of talking and another great meal I was off to take a short ride about 100 miles. While on this ride I learned that that batteries had died in the camera and my new travel compaion didnt think ahead to bring extra ones, but i can recall the trip very vividly.
When we first left I was placed securely in a saddle bag I was told this was for my safety due to being in traffic he was afraid that I would fall off with all the stopping and going. Then as soon as we got out of the city we stopped and I was allowed out. When I looked around the first thing that I saw was a BEAR crossing sign I have to say I felt at home when i saw that if noone would have been paying attention i would have run off into the woods and met my distant family members, but that wasn't to happen. I was given a nice warm place inside a coat with my head out so I could see the ride. It really was a great ride we stopped for gas and I met the gas station attendent they looked at me funny when they saw me and had to ask so i told them that seeing that I was so small and i didnt have my own bike I was hitchhicking across the country to see what this great land has to offer. They found this rather entertaining and even gave me a package of honey for the trip in case I got hungry. Rode for about an hour then I saw something on the right. I started fidgeting and we stopped. What did I see? Well i saw these kids not to much bigger than me riding around in Karts, and they were fast. So we stopped and i was told that it was just a day of practice. I'm kinda excited because i found out that we are going to go back on Sat because there is a party being held at the track and I was invited to come out. We stayed for a few min then it was time to get going again so we were off, not to much longer I was at my next safe haven. Right now I believe I am in Ormond beach florida not to far from the Ataltic Ocean, which i can't wait to see. I was told that Wednesday there is a "little" trip planned for me and I'm not being told where we are going but I'm excited about it.
So I will keep you posted on where and what I get to see, Until then please ride safe out there and if you already have pictures of me and my travels post them up so everyone can see where I've been.

Till then your four footed friend, Bob

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its not the destination but the journey you choose to get there


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PostPosted: Mon Jan 12, 2009 6:16 pm 
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Joined: Jul 25, 2003
Motorcycle: 98 Valkyrie
Rebel: 250
Country: USA
State/Province: GA
City: Vidalia
:sportbike:

_________________

Duke
"Skills must be Learned"
------ Herb Christian


"Ask your doctor if medical advice from a television commercial is right for _you_."


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PostPosted: Thu Jan 15, 2009 6:14 pm 
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Joined: Mar 26, 2008
Motorcycle: 1986 450 rebel
Rebel: 450
Country: USA
State/Province: FL
City: Daytona Beach
January 14th 2009

Today i woke up with the knowledge of a ride in store for me. So I woke up all excited and ready to go. The other guy on the other hand i found out is not a morning person at all and finally after 3 cups of something called coffee he was starting to get dressed. Me I was ready because as said before I have fur am am ready for the cold that nature can deal out, something that makes us stronger than humans but i know you guys and gals have opposite thumbs so i guess we are even.

So once he was fianlly ready I was placed in the front of his coat with my furry little head sticking out and ready for the call of the wild.

Our first stop was right at the ocean where I learned that ormond beach was the Birthplace of Speed not the Salt Flats. See 100 years ago they used to race and set land speed records in cars and on motorcycles. People would come from all around trying to break the records.

Then I found out about Glenn Hammond Curtis who was the fastest man on earth in 1907. He took an V-8 powered motorcycle on the beach and reached a speed of 136.4 MPh. Wow that was fast in 1907 on a road but to do that on the beach in sand that man might be considered crazy in todays standards i thought. But then i remembered My Time in Ga with duke and all those dirt roads we road on and I'm starting to think maybe Duke was practicing for a land spped record attempt on the beach. I ownder if he knows there is now a speed limit on the beach?


So after walking around he told me about the Stanley steamers that used to drag race on the beach every year and that it was a great big party and that every year they come back and close the beach down and reinact the days gone by. But even then Beach patrol sets a speed limit and if anyone breaks it they are fined but again its not about the racing but remembering where beach racing got its start.

So then we were back on the bike and cruising down A1A catching some nice views of the ocean. We stopped at the boardwalk and went out on the pier that went out for what seemed like forever, but thats when I learned that during the hurricanes 2 years ago it got so rough that over 100 feet of the peir came crashing down during the rising tide and waves.
But I did find a friendly ocean going creature that was really nice in the beginning

As my host turned around to see where the birds were this friendly creature suddenly showed why they are feared when they are in the ocean

Luckily my host turned around in time and saved me from having to show this shark who was boss and we walked back towards the bike.

Thats when the neat surprise came a short distance down the road we turned left and i'm thinking to myself umm there is water to the left and lots of it but this guy went right out on the beach and started riding down the coastline on the beach with people walking around, I start thinking who can i call for bail cause i know this can't be legal and we are going to get arrested but i was assured that it was legal and we were not going to get arrested. I have to say that first when i got on a bike all my worries seemed to be gone and there was a piece of mind whie riding, but that even goes one step fatrher when your riding in the sand while seeing the ocean waves crashing ashore and the smell of salt water in the air I was totally at piece with the world.


We rode the 7.3 miles of beach that you can ride while I learned about summertime on the beach at that it gets so busy that you can't park on the beach all you can do is "cruise" up and down and normally help some unforunate person who gets stuck. Which happens alot even my host buried a car out there but was laughing about it.
We got off the beach stopped and rinsed the bike off which is something smart to do no matter what your diving salt water and metal isnt a good combination.
We then took off our next destination taking some backroads. Our next stop? Daytona International Speedway! What a huge complex this was a bear my size could get lost really quick in there. I really wanted to go for a tour of the track but come to find out there was testing going on so the track and infield were closed to the public. Seeing that the Rolex 24is only a week away its time for that last minute practice that some teams can afford before they race for 24 hours on the track which starts the beginning of the race season.


After walking around a little bit we had to leave and go comfort some frineds who lost a friend overseas so our ride was cut short, I was saddened to learn about this and was willing to go and lend a soft shoulder to shed a tear on.

On the way there I was told that I would be going to work with my host on Thursday after the funeral so I better get some rest cause it would be a long night.

Till I rell you about Thursday's adventure Smile cause I'm having a blast in Florida
Your four fotted frind BOB

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its not the destination but the journey you choose to get there


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 Post subject: Bob's Travelogue
PostPosted: Sat Jan 17, 2009 5:10 am 
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Joined: Oct 19, 2008
Country: USA
State/Province: FL
City: Ocala
Well also to keep you updated about my short time with libracowgirl at her ranch I was surprised how much work goes into a place like this. it went from sunup to sundown. Libra had a dog also but again i wasnt scared her dog Hondo was very nice to me and well all got uptogether in the morning had our coffee and it was off to work. First things first i realized she had a tractor and it was used all the time I wanted to help so Libra gave me lessons till i can do it on my own


Then it was off to ride and train horses. Libra tought me how to ride on her best horse Amber and that was a fun treat She is such a good horses


I knew libra wanted to do alot more but out of the blue her youngest horse got hurt and we had to doctor him and all so not trips then

After that she also on Friday helped a friend at another barn so off on the rebel we went to another place where they had 12 horses and Libr did her thing.
On saturday she prepared me to meet up with Mrijam. we said our good byes to the horses, Hondo and the farm and off on the rebel
[/img]

Well mrijam and Libra had lunch man can these two talk for hours lol


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Jan 25, 2009 7:31 am 
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Joined: Mar 26, 2008
Motorcycle: 1986 450 rebel
Rebel: 450
Country: USA
State/Province: FL
City: Daytona Beach
Ok so alot has happened since I last checked in I have found out that going to college takes a lot of time from one's life. Me and my host get up early and head of to this building and sit there all day. then its off to do waht he calls studing and homework and I sit there while he tries to explain whats hes doing. i don't thing he understand that I have no clue what he's talking about.

Well on thurs we went out for a while but it was wierd having to ride in a cage. We got to out destination and I saw "The Den" well offically it the sports den but I'm a bear so all i saw was the word "Den"

My host introduced me to the crowd and let me go meeting people.





Then I met the bartender and she said had a little something for me




The next thing I knew we were having a great time. Trust me these people knew how to have a good time. This is when I noticed these two ladies sitting on the bass speaker



they seamed to be very content sitting there I didnt understand why.they tried telling me and all i got was something that it was better than third gear on a HD. I'm thinking I ride on Rebel so I didnt understand. My host tried telling me but again i didnt understand all i got was something about an 18 inch blah blah blah 2000 RMS 5000 peak blah blah blah able to move a full beer blah blah blah. I still don't know what they were talking about but I understood that they were sitting there and they didnt move for a long time.

Next thing I knew it was time to pack up and head home and I was ready



On the way home he stopped and woke me up to show me this


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its not the destination but the journey you choose to get there


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Feb 05, 2009 4:54 pm 
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Joined: Mar 26, 2008
Motorcycle: 1986 450 rebel
Rebel: 450
Country: USA
State/Province: FL
City: Daytona Beach
Ok so I have found out that my travel date is schedulled after a few changes. After working out a few details I was suppose to head up to pananma City Friday morning. Then I found out that surfgator had signed up to take me for a little tour of Florida a but father south, hoping it will be a little warmer. This was worked out with all parties involved withthe next leg of my trip.

So tomorrow morning i will be heading sown to Satalite Beach to spend some time with surgator and his group. After that I will be on my way to gbriwn. A short route change but isnt that the fun of a long cross country road trip?

I just hope I stay warm tomorrow morning its dupoosed to go down into the 20's again tonight... I thought I was in Florida, what happened?
me being a bear I wonder who might be responsible for this drastic climate change... Howard? Duke?

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its not the destination but the journey you choose to get there


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Feb 10, 2009 8:52 pm 
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Joined: Apr 27, 2008
Country: USA
State/Province: FL
City: Satellite Beach
Well, Bob went for a ride on my morning ritual today. Not as exciting as some, but hey, he's getting around!

First we got ready to leave the house.



Then we stopped at the beach to check the surf.



No surf, so guess we have to go to work. Oh, but we can see if anyone is catching fish at the river.



No fish, guess we have to go work.

You can see he was just as excited as me to finally get to work.



I had an idea! I immediately put Bob to work, and I went for a ride! Think anyone noticed?




Friday, we'll be headed back to Daytona to mrijam. Should be a fun trip!


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Mar 18, 2009 6:05 pm 
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Joined: Aug 14, 2008
Country: USA
State/Province: AL
City: Fairhope
March 18, 2009

I arrived by mail to gbrown's house in the little town of Fairhope, AL.


Fairhope is on the Eastern Shore of the Mobile Bay. Gbrown said that I came at a good time in that the next few days were going to be busy and exciting... wow... I can't wait... We are going for a ride tomorrow but I did get to check out Greg's Rebel..



Check back over the next couple of days and I will fill you in on all that is happening here in the Mobile area...

_________________
"Life is not measured by the number of breaths we take,
but by the moments that take our breath away."


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 Post subject: May 21, 2009
PostPosted: Thu May 21, 2009 9:30 pm 
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Joined: Aug 14, 2008
Country: USA
State/Province: AL
City: Fairhope
Whew...there has been a lot going on here since I arrived at gbrown's house in Fairhope... The first thing I got to do was go to a meeting of BACA (Bikers Against Child Abuse) It was a great meeting and I got to meet the Port City Chapter's President whose name is Tiny...

(me and Tiny)


(me and Krusher)


(me and gbrown ...whose BACA name is Big Daddy)

I had a great time and learned all about how BACA help abused children. You can find out about it at:
www.bacausa.com

Then there was the move... gbrown (aka: Big Daddy) lived in a house that had Raccoons living in the attic... lot of Raccoons... so Big Daddy had to find a house ... pack... move... unpack...OMG ... we were soooo tired...
Finally at the end of April things got back to normal...somewhat... and Gbrown took me to one of his gigs... We went to Lulu's... Lulu (or lucy) .is Jimmy Buffett's sister and Gbrown plays there every Sunday afternoon...
Here is a pic of one of the managers , Lydia, welcoming me to Lulu's..


here I am guarding the guitar while big Daddy takes a break...


it was a lot of fun... I was hoping that Jimmy would show up and sing Cheeseburger in Paradise... but he didn't... gbrown did sing the song and after the show I looked on the menu and there it was...Cheeseburger in Paradise...so that's what we had...yummmmm yummmm...
along with the burger we had some really good refreshing soda...well gbrown said it was a soda...but it didn't taste like a soda...who cares..it was good !!!



I am going to be going over to Mobile in a couple of days to stay with qutlass for a little bit... i'll post some pics of that visit soon...

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"Life is not measured by the number of breaths we take,
but by the moments that take our breath away."


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Jun 08, 2009 1:32 pm 
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Joined: Oct 4, 2007
Rebel: 450
Country: USA
State/Province: MS
City: Decatur
That bear must really like LA. "Lower Alabama" for all you non southern fried folks. Just wait till he gets across the border to Mississippi.

We may not have a Lulu's but we still got da blues, and Barbeque. Send that poor little old bear on over when ya'll get done with him. Looks like he may need a vacation. I'll introduce him to some of my Choctaw Indian friends when I go on my pilgrimage to make my contribution at their casino.

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Life's a journey, not a destination.
Aerosmith "Amazing"


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Jun 28, 2009 2:45 pm 
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Joined: May 6, 2004
Motorcycle: 2005 Yamaha Vstar 650
Rebel: None
Country: USA
State/Province: TX
City: Fort Worth
27 Jun 09
Well Qutlass and I decided to take a short ride (18 hours round trip) to visit Hercman and tame the dragon.

Well I'm tucked away in Qutlass's tank bag but here's a nice shot of getting through NC.

Here's a dam at the southern end of the tail.


We stopped for a short break at the top of the dam.

Here I am hangin with Qutlass

And here's Hercman and his wife.

Here's me an Qutlass leading the way through the dragon.

Here I am chillin at the resort.

Qutlass has more pics of me and I'm sure he'll post em.

We had a great run through the dragon. I am an official Dragon Slayer so all you other teddys out there I'm the bear!!!

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Romans 12:18
www.patriotguard.org


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Jun 28, 2009 6:10 pm 
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Librarian
Librarian

Joined: Sep 13, 2007
Country: USA
State/Province: MD
City: Woodsboro
WOW!!!
What a relief! The last couple days I've been working out what to do about Bob. I'm really glad he's getting about. To be honest, this has turned out to be a harder task than I had originally thought. But, I think it's beyond belief that the members of this great site want to do this. I have throughly enjoyed reading about all the places he's been so far. I want to give my deepest, warmest thanks to all how have helped and to those to are ready to take sponsor Bob for a ride.

You meet the nicest people on a Rebel!

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Do you know what it's like to fall in the mud and get kicked, in the head, by an iron boot? Of course you don't--no one does--that never happens. - Capt. Rex Kramer

1986 Honda CMX450C - Jola
1978 Honda GL1000 - Piper


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Jun 28, 2009 10:59 pm 
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Joined: Jul 21, 2007
Country: USA
State/Province: AL
City: Mobile
Much thx to hercman for posting those pictures. Had a great time riding Bob up to the dragon. Where will we end up next? Texas maybe? hmm..


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Jul 31, 2009 8:45 pm 
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Joined: Jul 21, 2007
Country: USA
State/Province: AL
City: Mobile
sry for the lack of updates guys and gals. i've been spending more time on 4 wheels than two lately, since my nephew is out of school for the summer. Will get back on it shortly. They go back to school on the 10th. :) Bob is still safe with me.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Oct 26, 2009 11:19 am 
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Joined: Jul 21, 2007
Country: USA
State/Province: AL
City: Mobile
Hi there! Checking to see if there's anyone on the gulf coast within reach of Mobile that would like to have a go with Bob. Post here or send me a pm. Otherwise I will have to ship him out before it gets to cold. Thanks.


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 Post subject: Bob Is Back In Georgia
PostPosted: Fri Nov 20, 2009 4:06 pm 
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Joined: Aug 2, 2008
Motorcycle: 2010 Vulcan Voyager 1700
Rebel: None
Country: USA
State/Province: GA
City: Gwinnett County
Hi folks! I know it's been a while since you guys (and gals!) have heard from me, but AtlAggie wanted me to let everyone know that exactly one year from the day I first arrived in Georgia, I have arrived safely back here. I feel all rested up and ready to do some RIDIN'!

I have to admit I was a little nervous knocking on Aggie's door today. Especially when those two HUGE dogs started barking at me! I was ready to turn around and fly back to LA. (Lower Alabama, right Qutlass?). After all, I had heard that Aggie does not ride a Rebel any longer, so I wasn't sure a little bear like me would be welcome. But then Aggie brought me inside, and introduced me to the yellow Lab and the black Lab that were making all the noise, and I started to feel better. And I really began to feel welcome when Aggie showed me his riding vest! Check out the patch by my right leg!



Aggie says the patch has been on the vest for months while he waited for me to ride!

So I think we are going to spend a few weekends here riding up to see some of the sights in the north Georgia mountains. I'm really anxious to see Helen, since the folks on the web site have told me how much fun they had there. If anybody has a spot where they would like Aggie to take me to see, just send him a PM.

After I visit with Aggie for a bit, I'm going to want to move on to someplace where it's still warm enough for me to ride. Aggie says he has some surgery scheduled for Dec. 14 anyway, so I'll need to move on by then. Send Aggie a PM here if you want me to visit with you next.
:bikerthumb:

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Road Captain & 1st Officer; SCRC Chapter 09

IMPERIAL RED/BLACK 2010 Kaw Vulcan Voyager 1700

RED/TITANIUM 2009 Kaw Vulcan 900 LT (18,500 miles)

RED 2009 Kaw Vulcan EN500C (9,000 miles)

BLACK 2005 Rebel (2,000 miles)


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