It is currently Thu Aug 18, 2016 8:57 pm

All times are UTC - 6 hours




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 28 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2
Author Message
 Post subject: Re: A note about safety
PostPosted: Wed Mar 30, 2011 10:06 pm 
Offline

Joined: Mar 19, 2010
Motorcycle: Yamaha Midnight Virago 920
Rebel: 250
Country: USA
State/Province: MI
City: Near Ann Arbor
Thanks Jim. I miss the old gang from time to time. The father of the two is long passed now. Colon cancer got him, never the bikes.
Its very true that to master anything, it is a process of gaining deeper understanding of the basics.
A colleague of mine has a saying. "An amateur practices until he gets it right. The professional practices until he can't get it wrong". There is a lot to be said for keeping the skills sharp. Training is a great way to get a good observer to look at and critique ones riding.

_________________
'87 Rebel
'02 Silver Wing 600
'83 Virago 920
'61 Buick


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: A note about safety
PostPosted: Thu Apr 07, 2011 4:48 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sep 6, 2010
Country: Canada
State/Province: NS
I took the Safe Rider Training course last year and here in Nova Scotia it is $475 dollars. The first time I had the Rebel out this year I was sqeezed out on one of our main drags and I had a car pull out of a side street right in front of me causing me to swerve and when I came left I actually dragged the left peg, BUT, I didn't panic and I knew what to do because of the Safe Rider Training course. I had my paramedic jacket on which is high visibility so I know those people saw me. The course, to me , is well worth the money. I ride with the Red Knights and they put an email out asking if we'd be interested in taking the advanced riders safety course as a group and I signed up right away. Just my 2 cents worth.

_________________
you bleed we speed, you call we haul, you stab them we slab em, no fetus can beat us
1985 Rebel 250


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: A note about safety
PostPosted: Sun May 08, 2011 3:17 pm 
Offline

Joined: Jul 4, 2009
Country: USA
State/Province: AZ
City: Chandler
I am big on visibility, and believe being seen is one of the most important safety concerns while riding a motorcycle. I see many riders around here, especially sportbike riders, riding solid black bikes and wearing all solid black gear. It seems to be the new "look". It is a good thing they are wearing all that gear, because IMO they are just asking to be run over. I wear a solid white helmet, and a neon orange or green jacket or vest with reflective stripes. I also have headlight and brakelight modulators on one of my bikes, and hopefully will be adding them to a couple more as soon as funds allow. The louder your horn the better, though I have a particular distaste for air horns. I use flat electric horns that are very loud, but someone in a cage with the A/C on and using a cell phone or has the stereo cranked up is not going to here any horn.

One other thing I have done to my Ninja 500 and my Genuine Stella scooter, is convert my turn signals into 4 way flashers, and use then OFTEN. (my Vulcan 750 came with 4 way flashers, my Rebel and XT225 do not have turn signals) It is legal to use 4 way flashers at any time on any road in my state as long as you are going less than 30 mph, and I pretty much do. They are always on when sitting at a stop light.

My XT225 does not have turn signals because it is a dual sport bike used almost exclusively off road and on dirt roads. I removed pretty much everything not needed for a dirt bike, except the headlight, tail/brake light, and horn, to keep it street legal. I only ride it on the road enough to get to a place where I can ride off road. It is not ridden at night.

I took the turn signals off the Rebel for looks (not recommending anyone do this), and use arm signals, which from my experience actually get more attention from cagers than signal lights, most likely because it catches their attention. I doubt most people even know what they mean anymore, but they look, which is definitely a good thing. I also lightly pump the brake lever to flash the brake light rapidly when I feel it is necessary. The Rebel also is not ridden at night.

_________________
"Obsolete doesn't mean it isn't any good, it just means it isn't made anymore"
"New vehicles move the body,old vehicles move the soul"
"If you understand, no explanation is necessary. If you don't, no explanation is possible"


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: A note about safety
PostPosted: Sun May 08, 2011 6:04 pm 
Offline

Joined: Jun 27, 2008
Rebel: 250
Country: USA
State/Province: MA
City: Amherst
Another thing to remember: if you find that you're looking for excuses not to ride, stop looking. Just don't ride.

I woke up the other day feeling a little off, and realized as I was putting on my helmet that I was trying to find an excuse not to ride. I put down the helmet, grabbed my car keys instead, and drove to work... and nearly rear-ended a parked car because I wasn't focusing well enough. That ride in would have been a lot more dangerous on a bike than it was in a car.

_________________
Image
My Flickr page.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: A note about safety
PostPosted: Sun May 08, 2011 6:40 pm 
Offline

Joined: Jul 4, 2009
Country: USA
State/Province: AZ
City: Chandler
amckenzie4 wrote:
Another thing to remember: if you find that you're looking for excuses not to ride, stop looking. Just don't ride.

I woke up the other day feeling a little off, and realized as I was putting on my helmet that I was trying to find an excuse not to ride. I put down the helmet, grabbed my car keys instead, and drove to work... and nearly rear-ended a parked car because I wasn't focusing well enough. That ride in would have been a lot more dangerous on a bike than it was in a car.



I agree. I have actually taken off on a ride many times, then decided I just didn't feel like riding, so I turned around and went back. Riding a motorcycle even semi safely takes everything you've got, and if you are not feeling well, or just not really feeling like riding, you are definitely not going to be at 100%.

_________________
"Obsolete doesn't mean it isn't any good, it just means it isn't made anymore"
"New vehicles move the body,old vehicles move the soul"
"If you understand, no explanation is necessary. If you don't, no explanation is possible"


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: A note about safety
PostPosted: Mon Oct 03, 2011 6:12 pm 
Offline

Joined: Oct 1, 2011
Motorcycle: 1986 Honda cmx450 Rebel
Rebel: 450
Country: USA
State/Province: VT
City: Pittsford
I agree
A friend of mine has a CB900 that I have ridden a few times. It is a large heavy bike that I do not feel at all comfortable on.
He wanted me to go for a ride with him, and for whatever reason, I didnt go because I just didnt feel like riding that day. I am very agnostic and I really felt something or someone was preventing me from riding that day.

_________________
...miles to go...
...before I sleep


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: A note about safety
PostPosted: Tue Jan 03, 2012 2:31 pm 
Offline

Joined: Jan 2, 2012
Motorcycle: 01 road king
Rebel: None
Country: usa
State/Province: pa
City: indiana
been riding for 25 years the msf course still helped me,best thing i ever did......bud


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: A note about safety
PostPosted: Tue Jan 03, 2012 4:31 pm 
Offline
Forum Moderator

Joined: Feb 23, 2009
Motorcycle: Rebel 250 plus a few others
Rebel: 250
Country: Canada
State/Province: NB
City: Fredericton
bud095 wrote:
been riding for 25 years the msf course still helped me,best thing i ever did......bud


I've heard this from many experienced riders that take the Basic course or an Experienced Rider Course. I think the reason is that they are taught the theory and practice behind basic manoevres they had been doing for a while without really thinking much about it. When you understand WHY you do things a certain way, and more importantly HOW you actually do it, it makes it easier to work on polishing that skill.
I recall talking to a young lady at our office whose boyfriend had taught her to ride. I asked mischieviously if she had learned how to do an emergency stop. Her response was short and to the point.. "well sure, brake hard straight ahead and don't lock either wheel."
I persisted and said something like " yes that was easy to say, and quite correct, but HOW do you do that? What technique do you use to ensure you are stopping as quickly as possible without locking up either wheel?"
She could not explain beyond "just braking hard." I allowed as how if she had taken the course she would not only know the technique, but would have a good chance of actually being able to do it on her bike without "layin' her down" :lol:

_________________
2004 Honda Rebel 250
2003 BMW K1200GT
2004 BMW R1200GS
1996 Ducati 900SS
1973 Norton 850 Interstate


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 28 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2

All times are UTC - 6 hours


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 6 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to: