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 Post subject: A note about safety
PostPosted: Fri Apr 28, 2006 9:24 am 
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Joined: Jun 25, 2004
Motorcycle: KTM Yamaha You name it
Rebel: None
Country: USA
State/Province: TX
City: Plano (dallas)
Folks,

Spring is here and almost past...

It looks like we're going to have some nice riding weather throughout. I hope everyone's had a chance to get their bikes out, tuned up, and on the road at least once so far this season. I know I have.

Some places are already getting "too warm" for some riders to ride, and those riders are waiting for the cool months of Fall to set in so they can resume riding again. Then again, some of us would ride in 120 degree heat, just so we could satisfy our addictions.

I'd like to focus on something VERY serious... it seems that this time of year, every year, marks a disturbing trend throughout the northern hemisphere. Once the winter weather subsides, the reports of motorcycle accidents increase. This year has been no different, there have already been many accidents throughout the country (and throughout the world), many of which have had unfortunate fatal results.

This is a great time to step back and assess your personal riding skills. You may be a long-time rider with many tens or hundreds of thousands of miles in the saddle, but that's no excuse to skip a refresher course, watch a safety video, or read some good books.

Some of our readers have not taken the MSF Basic Rider Course or have not taken it in some time. Other riders have taken the BRC, but have not taken the MSF Experienced Rider Course or have not had a refresher in some time. Both of these courses impart knowledge that will help you, as a rider, build the skills necessary to keep yourself in one piece.

I'd also recommend that everyone take a moment to check your libraries for copies of books such as David Hough's Proficient Motorcycling: The Ultimate Guide to Riding Well, More Proficient Motorcycling: Mastering The Ride and Street Strategies: A Survival Guide for Motorcyclists. Other great books include (but are not limited to) the MSF's The Motorcycle Safety Foundation's Guide To Motorcycling Excellence: Skills, Knowledge, and Strategies For Riding Right and Pete Hahn's How to Ride a Motorcycle: A Rider's Guide to Strategy, Safety And Skill Development.

A variety of excellent videos are available for purchase as well, if you prefer to watch rather than read. A number of our readers have experience with those videos, and I'm hoping they will be able to post some links for where to obtain the better examples.

It would be nice to have everyone around to share their experiences with us NEXT spring. 8)

Keep your brain engaged, keep the shiny side up, and ride safe!

_________________
cheers,
dj
"I'm No Expert"
2004 Rebel 250 (sold after 12,903 miles)
2007 KTM 525 EXC
2011 CBR250R
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Motoring on two wheels since 1983


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Mar 06, 2009 1:52 pm 
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Joined: Mar 5, 2009
Country: USA
State/Province: UT
I agree completely. Hough's Proficient Motorcycling: The Ultimate Guide to Riding Well, More Proficient Motorcycling: Mastering The Ride and Street Strategies: A Survival Guide for Motorcyclists are three of the best books I have ever read about our sport. They are easy to read and hold the interest of the reader, so they communicate the intent well. I try to re-read them every once in a while just to brush up on my skills and mindset. I checked them out at the library sveral times and finaly bought my own set. This was money well spent

_________________
Ron

1982 GL1100A
2001 KLR650
2009 CMX250


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Apr 28, 2009 6:33 pm 
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Joined: Dec 31, 2008
Country: USA
State/Province: NE
Barnes and Noble has em. Great read, couldn't put em down. I am gonna have to spend the bread I guess. I want to be around on the planet for a while. Check Amazon too.

_________________
2005 CMX250 Orange Rebel (sold)
1982 GL500 Silverwing (sold)
1981 GL500 Interstate (sold)
2006 CMX250 White Rebel
2007 CMX250 Red Rebel
2008 BMW F800ST


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 Post subject: A Note About Safety
PostPosted: Mon May 25, 2009 5:10 pm 
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Joined: May 9, 2009
Motorcycle: CMX 250
Rebel: 250
Country: USA
State/Province: AL
City: Gadsden
:D I agree with everything above and would like to add. . . No matter how hot it is, wear your protective gear. We have been in triple digits for the last two weeks here in Phoenix but God forbid that you hit the ground in a tee shirt. All of the reported MC accidents I have seen this year involved a car hitting a cycle or scooter, or pulling into the path of a rider - watch out for these dudes with their Bud holder alongside the gearshift!

MSF web site has some download videos that I like to re-watch every few weeks - just to refresh my memory. Keep taking those MSF refresher courses - I like to take one a year since I started riding again in 2005 and will sometime just "stop by" the road course of the school I went to to visit - I am always welcomed and usually introduced to the students whether I am on the Rebel or riding one of my scoots.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon May 25, 2009 7:56 pm 
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Motorcycle: 2006 Rebel 250
Rebel: 250
Country: USA
State/Province: GA
City: Metro Atlanta
I would add nick Ienatch's "Sport Riding Techniques," which imparts some track skills that also work on the street. I read it after Hough's books, and it agrees in great part but adds some additional insights. Amazon has it.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Oct 17, 2009 12:34 am 
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Joined: Jul 4, 2009
Country: USA
State/Province: AZ
City: Chandler
While I am fairly new to the Rebel, even though I'm on my third one, I am not new to riding. I started 45 years ago, at age 5, and have ridden hundreds of thousands of miles on every type and size of motorcycle imaginable, in all kinds of conditions. I have never had an accident, but I've had more close calls than I can count.


I highly recommend training, and learning all you can from all of your riding experience. There is no such thing as having enough skill or experience when it comes to riding a motorcycle.

_________________
"Obsolete doesn't mean it isn't any good, it just means it isn't made anymore"
"New vehicles move the body,old vehicles move the soul"
"If you understand, no explanation is necessary. If you don't, no explanation is possible"


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Nov 06, 2009 2:43 pm 
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Please , ride looking like an astronaut, Helmets definitely save lives !
:) :) :) :) :) :) :) :) :) :) :) :) :) :) :) :) :) :) :) :) :)


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Nov 06, 2009 5:44 pm 
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Joined: Jul 4, 2009
Country: USA
State/Province: AZ
City: Chandler
Helmets save lives yes. Bright or reflective clothing also saves lives, because more cage drivers see you. Riding the RIGHT way, by learning the proper skills also saves lives.

_________________
"Obsolete doesn't mean it isn't any good, it just means it isn't made anymore"
"New vehicles move the body,old vehicles move the soul"
"If you understand, no explanation is necessary. If you don't, no explanation is possible"


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 Post subject: A big plus one for David Hough's books...
PostPosted: Sat Apr 17, 2010 1:37 pm 
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Joined: Mar 21, 2010
Motorcycle: 2001 Honda Rebel
Rebel: 250
Country: United States
State/Province: NM
City: Albuquerque
I just finished "More Proficient Motorcycling" and have requested my local borders hold me a copy of the previous book.

The most important piece of safety equipment on any vehicle, regardless of how many wheels it has, is your brain. Same goes for guns too.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Apr 18, 2010 10:26 am 
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Joined: Jul 31, 2005
Motorcycle: 2005
Rebel: 250
Country: Central Washington
For any of you BMW owners out there, the National Rally is in Redmond, OR this year. David Hough and Lee Parks will be there. They will both be giving classes/disussions. And Mr Parks also 'rents' himself out for private group lessons. (And its not as expensive as I thought it would be).

_________________
couple of Hondas, couple of BMW's, couple of Guzzi's, some of these and some of those, too.


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 Post subject: Cost of MSF
PostPosted: Tue Sep 28, 2010 10:50 pm 
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Joined: Feb 2, 2009
Ok folks, I get that the MSF course is a good way to learn safe riding habits. However, in New Orleans it is expensive. ($300 plus) True enough they supply the bike, but I find the outlay of cash unacceptable. Don't give me a bunch of bunk on how much I value my life.

I think with some reading and viewing of the materials all of you mentioned, a mature individual with no daredevil ambitions and a leg up from a friend, it is possible to have a long and safe career.

I am 64 with prior experience on a moped and a HD 40 years ago. It is my intention to go from riding centuries on a Trek to touring on a light motorcycle in the 250 cc to 650 cc range. I am not convinced that everyone needs to throw 300 bucks away that could go toward decent safety equipment.

_________________
sic'em boy


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Sep 28, 2010 11:22 pm 
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Joined: Mar 21, 2010
Motorcycle: 2001 Honda Rebel
Rebel: 250
Country: United States
State/Province: NM
City: Albuquerque
Wow, the BRC was only $180.00 here in Albuquerque. And we got a fistful of coupons from several bike shops for discounts on gear.

Every individual must make their own value judgment on things like this. Once you do have your license and your own bike, perhaps the Experienced Rider Class would be worth it. I took it and found it useful. It was only $60.00 here.

With your prior experience and maturity you should do just fine. If you were 18 and never had a leg over a bike before, I would strongly advise you to cough up the dough for the class.


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 Post subject: Re: Cost of MSF
PostPosted: Wed Sep 29, 2010 5:27 am 
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Joined: Feb 23, 2009
Motorcycle: Rebel 250 plus a few others
Rebel: 250
Country: Canada
State/Province: NB
City: Fredericton
wfrhappy wrote:
Ok folks, I get that the MSF course is a good way to learn safe riding habits. However, in New Orleans it is expensive. ($300 plus) True enough they supply the bike, but I find the outlay of cash unacceptable. Don't give me a bunch of bunk on how much I value my life.

I think with some reading and viewing of the materials all of you mentioned, a mature individual with no daredevil ambitions and a leg up from a friend, it is possible to have a long and safe career.

I am 64 with prior experience on a moped and a HD 40 years ago. It is my intention to go from riding centuries on a Trek to touring on a light motorcycle in the 250 cc to 650 cc range. I am not convinced that everyone needs to throw 300 bucks away that could go toward decent safety equipment.


It's $430 here and going up... No governments subsidize it. Yet students who take it are almost unanimously enthusuastic (judging by course feedback forms) and feel it was worth it.
AS an instructor, I occasionally am approached on the street by a former student with a story about how their training kept them out of an accident.
So whether its worth it is up to everyone to decide. It is certainly not mandatory, but you will learn some things you didn't know from your past experience ...guaranteed.

_________________
2004 Honda Rebel 250
2003 BMW K1200GT
2004 BMW R1200GS
1996 Ducati 900SS
1973 Norton 850 Interstate


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 Post subject: Re: Cost of MSF
PostPosted: Wed Sep 29, 2010 6:28 am 
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Motorcycle: 98 Valkyrie
Rebel: 250
Country: USA
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City: Vidalia
Duckster wrote:
It's $430 here and going up...


Still cheaper than a casket ;)

_________________

Duke
"Skills must be Learned"
------ Herb Christian


"Ask your doctor if medical advice from a television commercial is right for _you_."


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 Post subject: Re: Cost of MSF
PostPosted: Wed Sep 29, 2010 6:41 pm 
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Joined: Sep 17, 2003
Motorcycle: 5 Shadows, 3 Rebels
Rebel: 250
Country: U.S.S.A.
State/Province: NV
City: Las VLX-as
wfrhappy wrote:
a mature individual with no daredevil ambitions and a leg up from a friend


I'd like to touch on the "learning from a friend" bit.

First off, it helps if this friend actually knows proper riding techniques. I would not want to learn from a friend whose greatest advice is "never use the front brake, it's dangerous" and "when it doubt, lay it down".

Also, it helps if this friend has no qualms calling out your mistakes as you make them. A friend that sees you using your rear brake only all the time who keeps reassuring you with "You're doing great" is not just a poor friend, but a poor teacher.

Daredevil ambitions aside, learning poor techniques from someone who has poor techniques is not going to help anyone in any way.

_________________
"Ride Safe, Chop Safer"
Dismantling, sawzalling, and rattle canning does not make a bobber. That's called an "ANCHOR".
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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Sep 29, 2010 6:55 pm 
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Joined: Mar 19, 2010
Motorcycle: Yamaha Midnight Virago 920
Rebel: 250
Country: USA
State/Province: MI
City: Near Ann Arbor
The friend that helped me the most talked me in to taking the MSF RSS class... and thereby hangs a tale...

_________________
'87 Rebel
'02 Silver Wing 600
'83 Virago 920
'61 Buick


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 Post subject: Re: A note about safety
PostPosted: Wed Jan 19, 2011 5:41 pm 
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Joined: Jun 4, 2006
Motorcycle: 1985 Rebel 250 - 1999 ACE 750
Rebel: 250
Country: usa
State/Province: NY
City: New York
Stay safe everyone ! *cheers*


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 Post subject: Re:
PostPosted: Sat Mar 19, 2011 10:18 am 
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Country: USA
State/Province: CA
City: Santa Rosa
Buickguy wrote:
The friend that helped me the most talked me in to taking the MSF RSS class... and thereby hangs a tale...


So are you going to share that tale ???

_________________
Two very good thoughts...
Courage is being scared to death... and saddling up anyway.
Bravery is being the only one who knows you're afraid.


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 Post subject: Re: Re:
PostPosted: Wed Mar 30, 2011 11:01 am 
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Joined: Mar 19, 2010
Motorcycle: Yamaha Midnight Virago 920
Rebel: 250
Country: USA
State/Province: MI
City: Near Ann Arbor
barbarian_rat wrote:
Buickguy wrote:
The friend that helped me the most talked me in to taking the MSF RSS class... and thereby hangs a tale...


So are you going to share that tale ???


When I started riding on the street legally (16), a friend three doors down that I had ridden dirt bikes with and his father invited me along on a ride. They were in to Brit bikes, the father being from England and having fought in WWII in His Majesty's Army. I usually had some old Japanese bike that had been cobbled together but they were always there to help me with it. When you rode with either or both of them the ride was always sane, safe, and well ordered. It was always fun to ride with either or both of them and the same could be said of anyone else they would invite on a ride. I took this to be the norm. At that time, no MSF existed. the years passed with things pretty much going the same way. I had a number of old bike cluttering the garage. The old bikes always seemed to need something. My friend had bought his Daytona new in '72 and never seemed to have as much trouble as my old bikes. Better than a decade later I finally decided to buy a new bike. Sticker shock set in quickly. The last I had looked, $1500 could get you a new 750. Still, I wanted a new bike. After looking around I had my choices dawn to three, a Rebel 250, A Rebel 450, or a Shadow 500. The sticker on the 250 was \nice but the real selling point for me was the body color frame. I liked the way that looked. When I closed the deal on the
Rebel, the dealer had a promotion for the fairly new "Rider Street Survival" class by the MSF. When you bought a new bike, they threw in a voucher for the course. I didn't think much about it, I had been on the road with my license for many years. When I went to show off my new Rebel to my friends, we talked about bikes and riding like we always did.
They also liked the look of the painted frame and decided to do the next Triumph they rebuilt that way too.
I mentioned the course in a somewhat disdainful way. They both asked why I would think so little of it. I told them I could understand for people just getting on a bike but I had been riding for quite a few years. It just didn't seem necessary.
The father said, "Well, you never know what they might know!" My friend jumped in with, "Anyone can learn more. It depends on having an open mind." I saw their point and conceded that it certainly couldn't hurt. The clincher was when my friend said "Besides, you have a voucher that its paid for. You get the class for free, or you could look at it as you paid for it when you paid for the bike. Either way its paid for, what it there to loose!"
So, I signed up for a local RSS course. I told them their arguments had convinced me. It never hurts to learn and its paid for. They both said that they felt I had made a wise choice.
Two weeks later, it was time for the course. I rode up to the place it was being held, took my gear and went in.
There were a several folks there with varying levels of experience.
The instructor came out and introduced himself. Then came out my friend and his dad that the instructor introduced as his co-instructors for the day. i must have turned three shades of red. I could see my friend wanting to laugh.
During the class, I kept my mouth shut and ears open. I did what they said, when they said. I did pick up quite a bit but the biggest benefit for me was a deeper understanding of the fundamentals. Before that class I had not heard of "counter steering". I didn't ask, I didn't challenge, I just did as they said.
After the class, we had a laugh about it. They told the other instructor that they knew me and had ridden with me for years.
The next time we got together for a ride, I had tons of questions. The first was "What is with this counter steering stuff? I've never heard of that. I could swear I'm turning the bars the way I want to go. Does that just work at the parking lot speeds we were using? " He told me "You've been doing it for better than a decade, you just don't know it."
So we went for a ride. When there was clear straight road, I tried a little push left go left, push right go right. Sure enough it worked. I could swear I had never done that but there it was working.. When we stopped for a cup of coffee and a smoke, I told my friend I played with the countersteer a bit and it sure does work. He told me he noticed me playing with it during the ride and was getting quite a bit of amusement from the look on my face. He explained that from our time riding together he was quite familiar with my techniques. He told me that when ever I was steering I dropped a shoulder on the direction I wanted to go. Without realizing it, that was the initial countersteer that put my bike into the lean.
Now that I knew what was going on, I should do it more efficiently. The rides after that I would try to gain as much knowledge as I could.
Some of the best things I learned from then was without words. I had made some friends at work who were getting in to riding. When we went out on a ride, I invited my old riding friends. After that initial ride, my old riding friends didn't ride with me if those guys were coming along. It only took me two more rides with the new guys to figure out why. They did some of the stupidest stuff I ever saw. They darn near got me in to an accident. I took the hint...
I was still welcome with my old Brit bike friends but those new and dangerous folks weren't.

Bottom line, the course is great. Even if you have been riding for a while, you can gain a deeper understanding of the basics. It is deep understanding and mastery of the basics that makes all great athletes, musicians, whatever, great.
Micheal Jordan was a great Basketball player. He could dribble, pass, and shoot very well with deep understanding of what he was doing, the basics of basketball. As a baseball player, he wasn't that good. Sure a great athlete but he couldn't field, pitch, or hit that well. Without the mastery of the basics, his baseball playing was unremarkable.

_________________
'87 Rebel
'02 Silver Wing 600
'83 Virago 920
'61 Buick


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 Post subject: Re: A note about safety
PostPosted: Wed Mar 30, 2011 2:52 pm 
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Motorcycle: Rebel 250 plus a few others
Rebel: 250
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State/Province: NB
City: Fredericton
That's a great story Marty, and a pretty good analysis of the advantages of getting the training.

_________________
2004 Honda Rebel 250
2003 BMW K1200GT
2004 BMW R1200GS
1996 Ducati 900SS
1973 Norton 850 Interstate


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